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Re: I have a problem I can not solve. confused smiley
Posted by: red64vair ()
Date: January 30, 2018 01:06PM

Nothing has changed.

Larry Blaylock
Saltillo, Mississippi
64 convertible
66 customized Corsa coupe


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Re: I have a problem I can not solve. confused smiley
Posted by: bwells ()
Date: January 31, 2018 05:40AM

Larry,

I may have missed where you tried another distributor, but if not running a rebuilt point plate with a better ground, try one. Also, if this vehicle is an auto, check your vac modulator line connections and the modulator.
Your symptoms seem to occur during high vacuum conditions, so look at everything that is exposed to or moves with vacuum.
After all the troubleshooting you have done, don't get weary and assume anything.When I have been in this situation, it is usually because I introduced another problem along the way.
Good Luck.

Bill Wells
North Texas Corvair Assoc.
www.northtexascorvair.org
61 Ramp
65 Corsa

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Re: I have a problem I can not solve. confused smiley
Posted by: Bob Helt ()
Date: January 31, 2018 08:53AM

Larry,
Since you have been fighting this problem for over a year now, My suggestion is to "throw in the towell" and get some serious help.

So I suggest that you locate a shop that has a chassis dyno and have them run a diagnostic test on your Corvair. Most chassis dynos are completely instrumented to detect and locate problems such as yours. My guess is that the dyno people could do all of this in about 15 minutes not including repairs, just diagnosis. Cost should,'t be excessive for this little run time.

Bob Helt

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Re: I have a problem I can not solve. confused smiley
Posted by: Timothy Shortle ()
Date: January 31, 2018 07:49PM

I had a miss on light throttle applications on my 69. I got lucky to find my wire between the coil and the points had a small spot where the insulation was missing and it would sometimes rub on the metal part of the distributor. The fix was easy. Finding it was not so easy.

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Re: I have a problem I can not solve. confused smiley
Posted by: Jim Stukenborg ()
Date: February 02, 2018 07:40AM

Larry, I had something similar with my 140. It turned out to be a badly worn distributor. The engine came from a car that was driven hard. Got a spare distributor to try. Jim

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Re: I have a problem I can not solve. confused smiley
Posted by: Richard ()
Date: February 02, 2018 09:03AM

From the beginning you have insisted that there is no vacuum leak. What method have you been using to test for a leak? A visual inspection is seldom of any value.
Try blocking air flow or solvent/ATF, as outlined below. I usually rely on aerosol Carb Cleaner.

From [www.therangerstation.com]

Vacuum Leaks:

Few things are more annoying than an engine that 'hunts' and basically runs poor at idle and light throttle. A vacuum leak is air that enters the engine unmetered. Cracked or broken vacuum lines, leaking intake manifold or carburetor gaskets, open carburetor fittings, and loose or missing carburetor screws are just a few of the causes of vacuum leaks. These leaks are often difficult to detect, especially those bothering intake manifold gaskets.

Perhaps the easiest way to determine if an engine has a vacuum leak is to cup your hand over the choke housing while the engine is idling. This artificial choke will create a richer mixture. If the idle speed increases with the richer mixture, there is a vacuum leak lurking about. Snap-On, Mac, and other tool emporiums sell inexpensive automotive stethoscopes to locate vacuum leaks. If these tools are unavailable, you can substitute a length of vacuum hose.

Place one end of the hose by your ear and use the other end to search for the leak while the engine is running. Be careful not to come too close to the fan or fan belts. If the engine is not a polished show piece, mix cleaning solvent with automatic transmission fluid in a squirt oil can. Shoots this mixture around the intake gasket. If there's a leak, engine speed should more than likely increase, but the most obvious sign will be white smoke from the ATF coming from the tailpipes. Other tricks include shooting aerosol carb cleaner around the suspect gaskets while the engine is running. When the carb cleaner hits the leak, engine rpm usually increases, thus pinpointing the source. The hardest part of fixing an unmetered air leak is finding it. These few tips should help.

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