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LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: October 11, 2016 07:54PM

Hi everyone. This is the first of what I hope is many posts with pictures of my interior upgrade and seat swap project. My LM's interior is in need of a refresh. The carpet is worn out and the seats are tired and tattered. I've debated sticking with an original interior vs upgrading. I've looked at a lot of pictures and done a lot of research and I finally have a complete vision that I'll attempt to complete over the coming winter months. I'll keep you all posted as the project progresses. Below is a working list of the items I plan on repairing, replacing and upgrading.

- Dynomat or Boom mat on the floor
- Lay Wires for future stereo upgrade
- New Carpet
- Fix drivers side door lock
- Dynomat or Boom Mat in the doors
- Replace broken passenger side arm rest
- Replace seats with Acura Integra leather seats, dyed blue to match existing interior color (front and rear)
- Replace steering wheel with wood rimmed wheel (I hear Momo is coming out with a new vintage wheel line)
- new parcel shelf with speaker cutouts behind rear seat
- center console with heat, oil and volt gauges
- New tachometer to replace the blank in the gauge cluster

I'm sure there will be adjustments to the list as I get working on it, but thats it for now.

I'll Get pictures of my recently purchased seats posted soon. Stay tuned.

Jared
Missoula Montana
68 Monza 110 4 Speed
and a whole stable of Saabs!

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: October 11, 2016 08:03PM

Sounds good.... Take measurements of the seat legs.... that helps us all..





MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: vairsnvettes ()
Date: October 11, 2016 09:14PM

Will be watching this with interest. Both for the work you do and the info others post.

Mark
66 Corsa
Memphis

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: kenzen ()
Date: October 12, 2016 05:13PM

Since you mentioned pre-wiring for a stereo install, see below "10 Commandments" of car stereo installation. I found it on a web site somewhere - wish I captured the source to give credit where credit is due.

The Ten Commandments

I. The best cure is prevention. I cant overemphasize this point. If you've ever spent an entire weekend tearing an installation apart in order to eliminate some noise, you know what I mean. Take the time to sketch the system out before you begin the install. This graphic representation of the installation will help you to avoid introducing ground loops and will serve as a road map for eliminating noise if it is present.

II. Dont introduce ground loops. Ground loops are created whenever an audio ground is established at more than one location. Theoretically, the only place the audio ground should be connected to the chassis ground is at the source unit. In my experience, Ive found that in systems that have noise problems, a ground loop is the culprit nine times out of ten.

III. Never run signal wires alongside power cables. This is especially true in installations where high powered amplifiers are used. Large amplifiers are capable of drawing large currents. These currents vary with the musical demand of the program material as does the electromagnetic field surrounding the power cable. The more current that flows through the wire, the bigger this field becomes. If audio cables are located in close proximity to this fluctuating electromagnetic field, noise could be induced into the system.

IV. Always use 100% shielded audio cable. This will insure maximum protection against induced noises by power cables and other sources of electromagnetic interference. Good audio cables are not cheap. If you prefer to make your own cables, I would recommend using a wire with a foil shield surrounded by a drain wire.

V. Never use the ground wire in the vehicles OEM radio harness. This wire usually makes a very poor ground due to its length, small wire gauge, close proximity to other power wires, and unknown termination point. Instead, ground the source unit directly to the chassis or firewall.

VI. Make sure the amplifiers have a good audio ground reference. In order for the amps to function properly, the audio ground must be referenced to chassis ground at the source unit. If it is not, the amplifier could oscillate. To check for a good ground reference, take a volt-ohm meter (VOM) and measure the resistance between the chassis of the radio and the shield of the RCA line level outputs of the radio. This reading should indicate a direct short. If this is not the case, grounding the shield of the RCA line level outputs to the chassis of the radio will probably be necessary.

VII. Keep amplifier power ground wires as short as possible. The longer a wire, the more resistance it has. When a current flows through a resistance, a voltage drop is produced. Because of this, the ground reference at the amplifiers circuit board is no longer the same as that at the chassis of the vehicle. This ground potential differential can lead to noise and improper operation of the amp.

VIII. Dont connect all of your amplifier ground wires under one bolt. Contrary to belief, this is not required if the rest of the system is installed properly. If you do connect more than one power ground wire under a single bolt, you run the risk of amplifier ground modulation. This is caused by the current demands of, for example a woofer amp, modulating the power ground wire of a tweeter amp. This results in a squeaking noise that can be heard over the tweeters whenever bass notes hit.

IX. Make sure all levels are set correctly. Level setting is a critical part of the installation process. If done properly, maximum system signal to noise ratio can be obtained. Keep in mind that you want to drive the audio cables that feed the amps in the rear of the car as hard as possible. To do this, reduce the gain of the amplifiers to minimum. Turn up the volume on the source unit to 80% of maximum. Now adjust the input sensitivity of the amplifiers upward until the maximum intended loudness is obtained.

X. Noise filters can only reduce noise, not eliminate it. A noise filter is just that, a filter. And like any other filter (crossover network, etc.), it works by modification, not elimination. Some installers rely on filters heavily. In some instances a filter may prove necessary, but I believe that if the system is installed properly, a filter is usually not required.

About now most of you are probably making strange faces and saying "Now you tell me!" Well, all is not lost. If you have already installed your auto sound system and are unfortunate enough to have some noise, here are a few suggestions on where to look and what to do.

Alternator Whine

To me, alternator whine is the most annoying form of noise. For those of you who are lucky enough never to have been exposed to alternator whine, it sounds like a miniature siren that rises in pitch with the speed of the engine. Alternator whine is almost always caused by a ground loop. The following steps will aid you in locating and correcting a ground loop problem.

Verify that all levels are set properly. (Click here for related article.)
With the system turned off, unplug the RCA inputs to the amplifier.
Start the vehicle and turn the system on. If the noise is gone go to step 8. If the noise is still present, it is coming from the amp or the speaker wiring. Continue.
Turn the system off and disconnect the speaker harness.
Start the engine and verify that no noise is present. In a few rare instances, I have actually heard speakers reproduce noise without being connected to an amplifier. This noise was being induced by power cables that were very close to the speaker wire. If you do have this type of noise, reroute the appropriate speaker lead and go to step 3.
With the speaker harness still disconnected, check to make sure there are no shorts between the speaker leads and the chassis of the vehicle. A shorted negative speaker lead will create a ground loop by establishing a second audio ground reference point. If you do have a short, trace the wire out and repair it then go to step 3.
With the RCA inputs and speaker harness still disconnected from the amplifier, use your VOM to measure from the shield of the RCA jacks on the amp to the chassis of the vehicle. This reading should not be a direct short (100 ohms or more is acceptable.) If this reading does indicate a direct short, you might have a defective amp and should contact the manufacturer for verification.(Note that there are a few "inexpensive" amps or boosters on the market that have their audio ground and electrical ground commoned internally. For units of this type, the information in this article will be of very little value.)
If youve made it here, you know that the amplifier and speaker wiring are okay.
Connect the accessories in front of the amp (crossovers, equalizers, etc.) one at a time and check for alternator whine. When each device is tested, there should be nothing plugged into the input of that device. In this way, we will work toward the source unit piece by piece. Be sure to turn the system power off before connecting or disconnecting any cables or accessories.
Repeat step 9 until all accessories have been tested.
If a particular accessory is causing noise, try disconnecting its power ground wire. Go to step 9.
Now its time to connect the source unit. Do that now and test for noise.
If noise is present, try unplugging the antenna. If the noise goes away, you will need to use an antenna isolator. This little gismo opens the shield wire of the coax to eliminate the ground loop caused by the ground at the antenna.
If you still have noise, try connecting the source units ground wire in another location, preferably as close to the source unit as possible.
Does the noise vary in amplitude when you adjust the volume control? If it does, the problem is probably power line related and not a ground loop. If this is the case, run the source units B+ (yellow) wire directly to the positive terminal of the battery. If this doesnt do the trick, you will probably have to use a power line filter on the source units B+ (Yel) and Ignition (Red) wires.

Ignition Noise

Ignition noise is another type of noise that is quite annoying. It usually sounds like a popping or buzzing sound whenever the engine is running. The best cure is to remove the motor but since we cant do that, we will have to rely on some other form of remedy. Follow the steps below to eliminate or reduce ignition noise.

Make sure you are using resistor type spark plugs and resistor type plug wires.
Determine where the noise is coming from. If the noise is a popping sound that occurs 2 or 3 times a second, you probably have a loose or bad plug wire. First, make sure that all plug wires are seated properly. If this doesnt do the trick, you may have a bad plug wire. Usually this occurs due to a pinhole in the insulation of the wire. Whenever the plug wire is energized, an arc jumps through the pinhole to the chassis of the vehicle. Replace with silicone resistor plug wires.
If the noise is a buzzing sound, the problem is usually associated with the points, distributor, or coil. Try replacing the condenser on both the coil and points. Make sure all plug wires are seated properly in the distributor cap. Additionally, you might try adding a 2200uF cap from the positive terminal on the coil to chassis ground.
Dont use the fuse block in the vehicle to derive power for the source unit. Run the Constant Hot B+ (memory) wire directly to the batterys positive terminal.
If you still have noise, it could be occurring because of induction. Try pulling the source unit out of the dash and check for noise. If the noise is eliminated, try rerouting any wiring harnesses that are close to the deck. If this is not possible, try using self adhesive metal shielding. This might just do the trick.

Turn On/Off Thump

Turn on thump can vary from a slight pop to a mind shattering, teeth rattling BOOM! This thump is caused by the audio circuitry stabilizing when power is applied. Most amplifiers and source units have muting circuitry that lasts a couple of seconds to allow these fluctuations to subside before passing a signal. However, if the amplifier un-mutes before the source unit or any other accessory, you better watch out. Here are some things to try if you have turn on thump.

Verify that the amp has a good audio ground reference. (See rule 6 of the Ten Commandments of noise free installation.)
Dont install the system so the amplifiers can be switched on when the source unit is turned off.
If you still have thump, add a turn on delay module in line with the remote turn on wire to the amp.
This concludes the section on turn on thump.

System Hiss

Hiss is usually most noticeable over the midrange and tweeters. The reasons for this are simple. The human ear is more sensitive to the frequencies reproduced by these drivers. Mids and tweets are usually far more efficient than their low frequency counterparts. And, these drivers are usually mounted closer to the listener. If you have hiss, you probably have your levels set improperly. See rule 9 of the Ten Commandments of noise free installation.

While I know that I havent covered all the forms of noise or even all of the methods of dealing with it, I hope that Ive made a good start. By adhering to the Ten Commandments and investing a little persistence, you will be rewarded with a noise free installation.

kenzen
66 Monza Coupe 110/PG
Bel Air, MD

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: October 12, 2016 08:55PM

Kenzen, I'll be referring back to this at some point. Thanks!

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: November 11, 2016 08:05PM

Happy Veterans Day! The bank was closed today so I took my free day to get started on my seat dyeing project. The seats I picked up are out of a '98 Acura Integra sedan. They are in pretty good shape, they have been in storage for a while, so they are no worn, but they were pretty stiff. Prior to doing any prep on the seats, I spent some time thoroughly cleaning and conditioning them. I cleaned them with diluted Downy laundry soap. Once clean, I did four rounds of Leatherique leather conditioner. Put the conditioner on, wait 48 hours, clean and repeat. Below are pictures of the cleaned and conditioned seats prior to prep work today.






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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: john.jackson ()
Date: November 11, 2016 09:35PM

Seats look nice. Can you post measurements for the back seat compared to stock Corvair seats?

Also can you post measurements for front seat mounts compared to stock Corvair?

Do the front seats fold forward and are they power or manual seats?

Looking forward to seeing results.

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: November 12, 2016 11:58AM

I got a leather dye kit from furnitureclinic.com. I sent a sample of the original blue vinyl for a color match. I ordered everything I needed to strip the seats down, repair a few minor blemishes and re-color the seats.

My project yesterday was to strip the original leather coating, repair a few cracks and prep the seats for color at a later time.

Below are pictures of the seats after striping them, adding a leather binder, filing cracks and sanding with 1200 grit sand paper. They are now ready for color.






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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: November 12, 2016 12:19PM

Big difference!





MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: jmaechtlen ()
Date: November 13, 2016 08:14AM

huh - you just listed a bunch of things I didn't know about leather seats.
thanks for the clues.
How did you find the seats - a local ad?

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: November 25, 2016 10:23AM

Bargain of the day! I'm at work, but struggling to focus. I've been shopping for sound deadening products and had pretty much decided on going with a company call secondskinaudio.com. I popped onto there website this morning on a whim. Turns out they are having a black Friday sale for 30% off. I just ordered their vibration damper and sound barrier for the floor of the Corvair. I saved $150 bucks on my purchase!

I'll be posting floor prep and installation pictures soon.

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: November 25, 2016 10:26AM

jmaechtlen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> huh - you just listed a bunch of things I didn't
> know about leather seats.
> thanks for the clues.
> How did you find the seats - a local ad?


I had been trolling craigslist and ebay. The ultimately ended up on Craigslist in Spokane WA. I to drive to get them, but had been searching locally and nothing was coming up. I knew these were the seats I wanted and they were in good shape, and the price was right. They were worth the drive!

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: November 25, 2016 12:21PM

Bargain # 2 today. Rust Bullet is 40% for Black Friday. I just ordered a quart of paint a bottle of metal prep to prep and paint the floor boards before installing sound deadener.

Forget everyone else, I'm buying my own Christmas gifts todayhot smiley

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: County98 ()
Date: December 28, 2016 08:36PM

Really curious how your seat install goes. I scored some BMW seats that have almost the same rear seat shape and I've been scratching my head on getting it the way I like. Hope to follow your lead!

If you want to see my misadventures with the rear seat, it's in my thread. It wanders a lot, but the seat stuff is in there with pics.

[www.corvairforum.com]

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: January 08, 2017 04:20PM

Its been a while since I last posted, but in the past month or so, I've made some progress. The biggest project completed was dying the seats to match the existing interior color. In previous pictures, I had stripped and prepped the seats. The next step was to color and clear coat. The furniture clinic product acts like a modern exterior paint, with a color coat and base coat. See pictures below.

My Setup before applying any color


First Coat of dye applied by sponge with a focus on seams


After three additional coats sprayed on with an airbrush


First clear coat, the first coat of clear is a high gloss clear coat, you can see the sheen in this picture


Finished product with the final satin clear coat applied. I was worried the finished product would be too shiny, but the final coat of satin really mellowed out the finish

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: January 08, 2017 04:27PM

Look great!! Now to see how they hold up over time / use.





MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 406Vair ()
Date: January 08, 2017 07:35PM

Here are pictures of the interior cleaned out. The first two are before. The second two are after a good wire brushing and prepping with Rust Bullet Metal Blast. Next up is two coats of Rust Bullet paint.

Its nice to see that the floors were in pretty darn good shape!

Before cleaning or treating




After wire brushing and paint prep



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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: igottajob2 ()
Date: January 08, 2017 07:38PM

Looks great!!!!!!!!!!!!smileys with beer

Minneapolis,MN

1965 500 Coupe
95HP

Built the 1st week of April of 65 at willow run.
500 coupe. The only factory accessory is a rear antenna.
White with a red interior.
Now black with black and red interior.


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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: glivorsi ()
Date: January 09, 2017 11:38AM

I was very happy with the results of Rustbullet on my floor. The biggest advantage to it is that it bonds to existing paint. There is no reason to remove the factory primer down to bare metal. I just wirewheeled over everthing- new steel, surface rust, and good factory primer- then applied the two coats.

Greg in Wildwood, MO (part of the St. Louis urban sprawl)

1965 Monza Vert 110PG, Crocus Yellow with black interior and top

2014 Honda Accord V6 (DD)
2017 Honda Pilot (wifemobile)
2012 Chevy Sonic 1.8L (kid's car)
1997 Honda CBR1100XX
2006 Mazdaspeed 6 (no longer own)

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Re: LM seat swap and interior update project thread
Posted by: 65180 ()
Date: January 09, 2017 12:28PM

Great choice on the seats. I put a set in my L/M and love them. My car is stiffly sprung with nylon/ploy bushings and these seats took the harshness out.

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