Corvair DiagramCorvair Photo
Corvair Center
home forum corvairs calendar links Corvair Podcast
California Corvairs
Clarks Corvair
Clarks Corvair
“CORSA"



Chevy Corvair License Plate
Chevy Corvair Chrome Wheel
Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: December 07, 2016 04:18PM

Amazing detail!thumbs up smileys with beer

Corventure Dave

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 15, 2016 04:36PM



If I did it again . . .

The bulk of the undercoating has been removed and here’s the pile.

Post your best guess at how much it weighs (I’ll post actual weight in a few days). Granted, there’s some dirt (and mud wasp nests) mixed in, which compensates for all the undercoating dissolved into solvents.

I removed the front bumper and lower body corner pieces to gain access below the cowl. Those corner pieces were well undercoated.

and the easiest way to clean them was to soak in diesel for a couple of days.

They look good, no serious rust, but will need metal work to restore shape.

I used a different method to remove much of the undercoating on the front end of the Firebrier. Dry ice.


I had read online about using dry ice to remove undercoating, but didn’t try it until now. I purchased 30 pounds of dry ice pellets, and spread piles on flat surfaces above areas with undercoating (the piles were also covered with blankets for insulation). When the metal reached deep freeze in about 10 minutes, extending about half way down the sills, the undercoating chipped off rather easily, often in large flakes using just a small putty knife.


I found the pellets held up for several hours, long enough to remove the undercoating from several locations, before subliming away. Not only was this far easier than using the torch and vibratory multitool, but the undercoating came off much cleaner, leaving the paint with almost no residual undercoating.


If I did it again...
I would buy 100 lbs of dry ice and use it to remove the undercoating on all of the upper surfaces of the undercarriage. The torch, vibratory tool and elbow grease would still be needed in other areas. And of course, a lot of detail work is required to remove residual undercoating and original paint before refinishing.

Steve

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: ROD ()
Date: December 15, 2016 07:43PM

30 lbs

Rod Tetrault
El Cajon , CA
65 Corsa Yenko Clone / 65 Corsa EO Creampuff Vert
66 Corsa "JIMISH" Mid engine Turbo LS1 currently 2nd fastest Corvair in the USA
Class 5 Corvair powered Baja
61 Vintage Rampy
Corvair powered Buggy x 3
Enough hidden parts to build a space ship

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: December 16, 2016 07:32AM

That Dry Ice is a great tip!thumbs up I also heard of that but thought it was just a rumor. The great thing about Dry Ice is there is no residue or water left over.
smileys with beer

Cprventure Dave

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: MtnVairMike ()
Date: December 16, 2016 07:39AM

38 pounds.

Mike

1966 Monza Convertible, 140HP-4 speed, Ermine White

Others in the menagerie...
72 Corvette Stingray, 58K miles, owned since 86
72 MGB, 112K miles, bought from original owner in 09
78 Chevy pickup, 124K miles, bought new in 78
93 Corvette, LT1/6spd, 210K miles, daily driver since 96

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Paulsgt ()
Date: December 16, 2016 09:10AM

42 lbs.

Paul Sergeant
CORSA Central Division Director / CORSA Treasurer <-new title
Lee's Summit, MO
CORSA since 1975
Member – HACOA, Corvair Minnesota, CORSA, Little Indians, POCI



Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 19, 2016 05:22PM


Side Projects, Questions, and the Winner is...

Here is the innards of the air cleaner oil bath; cleaned and flushed with gasoline to wash the jute packing.

I know nothing about these units. It appears to contain two grades of jute fiber, a course fiber at the top, which cleaned well. But the jute at the bottom is a finer grade and appears to be choked with some sort of sediment that didn't come out. Can anyone tell me if this is a problem, and should it (can it) be replaced?

The exhaust manifolds have been cleaned and painted.


The studs were pretty rusted and were upgraded with stainless steel replacements from Clarks. With some serious heat and torque, two studs were extracted intact, but two snapped off. These had to be drilled out up to 5/16 dia and then retapped.

Question: is there any reason I should not cut off the ends of the studs sticking out below the manifold ears? The original studs did not stick out like this.

I noticed that the exhaust system was not included among the applications listed for standard VHT High temp paint, so I used their extreme high temp "Flame Proof" paint. Both the primer and paint were heat cured as directed. Overkill? I rest comforted knowing that, should the engine ever catch on fire, at least the exhaust manifolds will still look good!

And finally...
Paul is the winner with his guess of 42 lbs of undercoating, off by only 1 pound. Image of the scale, tared for the weight of the container, showing 43 lbs of undercoating.


Makes me wonder about the original volume of the undercoating with the solvents.

Steve



Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: December 21, 2016 09:48AM

I say... It's your choice on cutting the manifold studs. I see know problem leaving them as is. The paint will probably burn away. I just media blast the manifolds and let them be as they did originally.

The oil bath... Have you tried spraying brake clean on the bottom sediment?
I have the oil bath filter in my Rampside. It has no oil in it. I used to have one functional in my Greenbrier back when we had horses. It really catches the dust but also wicks oil up and makes a bit of a mess. For show and not function, there is no need to have oil in that filter. The paper filters still do their job.

Corventure Dave

Attachments:
Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 21, 2016 04:30PM

Dave, Great tip about running the oil bath sans oil. I'll probably do that.

I decided to cut off the manifold studs - they just don't look right sticking out.

Wow, those manifolds will need to get pretty hot for the paint to burn off.

Steve

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Paulsgt ()
Date: December 21, 2016 05:12PM

Hey Steve, Do I win 43.4lbs of 55 year old undercoating???

I'll make you a deal...You can keep it and send me 100# of dry ice

smileys with beer

Keep up your posts. They are an inspiration to all of us who have an FC waiting to be restored.

Take care.

Paul Sergeant
CORSA Central Division Director / CORSA Treasurer <-new title
Lee's Summit, MO
CORSA since 1975
Member – HACOA, Corvair Minnesota, CORSA, Little Indians, POCI



Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 21, 2016 05:18PM

Paul,
If Rumpke makes deliveries, it's all coming your way.
Steve

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 21, 2016 07:02PM


The shrouding is Back (In Black!), blasted and powder coated (click on image for larger view)


And the air cleaner canisters, etc., have been blasted and painted (click on image for larger view)

These were primed and then painted with a semi-gloss acrylic enamel custom mixed to match the original color. This paint uses a hardener, which will make the paint resistant to engine conditions.

As you may have noticed, the engine sealing fabric has been installed on the shrouds.

Installing the fabric correctly was one of the most exasperating projects so far. The task is particularly arduous because the replacement staples need to go through the original holes of the shroud and retainer while passing through the tough fabric seal in between. Keeping everything aligned is not easy. Furthermore, the staples that Clark’s sells were too narrow, and each one had to be expanded. I used this little jig, into which each staple was hammered to spread the legs.

I don’t think this was Clarks' fault, rather just variation in GM's assembly tools. The staples are also made from a slightly larger gauge wire than the originals, necessitating expanding all of the holes (I used a #51 drill bit).

The best way to install the fabric was to start with the staples in the center of the shroud and then work outward, doing approximately every other staple. I found this is the best way to assure that the staples holes would line up. It was, none-the-less, a challenge to get each staple through the holes on both sides.


The staples came with a few suggestions on how to crimp them. One suggestion is to use needle nose pliers, but I found the staple wire is too strong to bend by hand. I used a metal punch.

Inserting staples and crimping them in the curved parts of the shrouds is a real challenge. Using C-clamps to hold everything in place can help. Honestly, At least in my hands, I cannot image doing this with painted (rather than powder coated) shrouds; paint would scratch and chip too easily with all of the gyrations needed.

All four are done.

Actually, staples of the rear seal pass only through the shroud and fabric (no retainer). I also was intrigued that the staples of the front shroud were inserted in one direction on the left side of the shroud and in the other direction on the right side (so I replicated this).

Steve


Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: ROD ()
Date: December 21, 2016 08:31PM

I feel your pain on the perimeter seals. They sure look nice when installed.
Great work.

Rod Tetrault
El Cajon , CA
65 Corsa Yenko Clone / 65 Corsa EO Creampuff Vert
66 Corsa "JIMISH" Mid engine Turbo LS1 currently 2nd fastest Corvair in the USA
Class 5 Corvair powered Baja
61 Vintage Rampy
Corvair powered Buggy x 3
Enough hidden parts to build a space ship

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: December 22, 2016 03:13AM

Never again will I use Clark's staples. The most rediculous project of all.
Looks great,Steve.

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: FLSteve ()
Date: December 22, 2016 04:59AM

I used stainless steel wire cut and then bent each one back took about 20 minutes (max) a side as I recall.

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: December 22, 2016 06:21AM

Steve

Is this for the oilbath? Looks like a heater hose hanger.

Attachments:
Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 22, 2016 07:34AM

Ring and upper bracket are for the oil bath. Lower bracket inside ring is an air cleaner canister mount.
Steve

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: December 22, 2016 11:40AM

I used copper wire for the staples. Painted them black after installation. The 12 or 14ga copper wire is easy to work with. I drilled the staple holes to match the wire. The hold is as secure as the OEM wire and a few years down the road easy to remove if the seal strips get messed up or torn.

Corventure Dave

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 23, 2016 07:27AM

With my exceptional 20:20 hindsight, I would have gone with Dave's copper method. Since any current method is not the same as the original, I suspect it's possible easier to crimp the copper to mimic the original. Could be painted silver as well. Actually, I believe it is not too difficultto even silver plate copper.
Steve

Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Lane66m ()
Date: December 23, 2016 07:50AM

This is what I bought to staple my seals to the tins.

Al Lane
Ellabell GA

1966 Monza Coupe, 110 hp, 4 Spd
1968 Camaro SS Coupe 350 CI 295+ HP PG
1964 Greenbrier Deluxe, 6 dr, 80 hp car engine, PG
2015 Chevrolet Malibu 2LT
2018 Chevrolet Silverado LTZ Z71 Centennial Edition
1947 Farmall A tractor 15 hp


Attachments:
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
This forum powered by Phorum.