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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: April 11, 2018 05:01PM

Aha! Makes sense. Thanks Bob. It would be interesting to know when the change was made. Would Corvan and Greenbrier owners be willing to look for the two tell-tale bolts at the very back of the rear inside panels. If you have the brackets could you let me know and we'll look for the earliest VIN.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: April 14, 2018 07:07PM


A big day. Finally the household hazardous waste day. I had accumulated almost 30 gallons of waste - mainly parts cleaner and diesel fuel.

I know that is some more progressive areas there are permanent drop-off sites for Household hazardous waste. Here in Marietta, they now only occur sporadically, but generously funded by some of our local chemical companies.


I decided to install the weatherstrip on the rear doors. My advice to anyone installing weatherstrip is to make a jig that you can use to make 45O cuts.

This is mine and it's essential to get good corners. Also, It's a good idea to wipe down the weatherstrip with isopropyl alcohol to remove any remaining release agent.

Something I noticed when I removed the original weatherstrip was that the corner seams were reinforced with a "L"-shaped rubber insert. I had never seen this before and did not find it in the assembly manuals, but it must be original, so I decided to reproduce it.

Sized to fit the larger weatherstrip inner hole, with some weatherstrip applied inside and on the cut surfaces, they work marvelously to hold the corners together while the cement dries. They are really useful to temporarily hold the weatherstrip together when making preliminary cuts. I use them to cut and cement together the weatherstrip for a door before installing it.

The result is nice clean secure corners. I've not seen that these are available anywhere. Is there any interest by others in using them?

A final note. One of the tricky parts of installing weatherstrip, Is applying the cement on the rubber and then not having it get stuck on something. My solution is a tall pole and a string that I use to suspend the weatherstrip as I install it.


Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: April 21, 2018 07:20PM


Front air vent flapper doors - today's project. Firebrier's were structurally sound but with a lot of surface rust.

First step was to remove the old rubber seal, and then the doors were juiced in the electrolytic deruster tank overnight, wire wheeled to remove residual oxide, primed and painted. Now ready for replacement of the seals.

Clarks sells new rubber seals; with a note that they're easy to replace, but not so. The instructions provided are correct as far as they go. To replace the seals, you need to carefully pry apart the two metal plates that comprise doors and hold the seal in place.

But this is a darn hard task since the metal plates do not separate easily along certain sides of the door. The task was accomplished using a couple of little screw drivers and carefully fitting in the seal while working around the door. But oddly that is where Clark's instructions end, which leaves the rubber seal extending flat from the sides of the door - which will not allow the door to close. In order for the door to be functional, the seal must be folded back upon itself at two points so that it curves away from the door in opposite directions on different edges. On the original doors the seal is cemented where it folds across, as shown in the image insert below.

Recreating this is the tricky part. I had dealt with this problem when I restored my '61 'brier a half dozen years ago, and fortunately I still had the simple tool I made for the task.

It's a 1/2" aluminum metal strip bent to follow the contour of the door then pulled tight to hold the rubber seal in the needed contour. I apply a little weatherstrip cement in the fold. I also apply a little paint along the folded edges to lock them in place (I have always used POR 15 for this because it works, but maybe any type of enamel would work as well). Here's a completed door.
.
When installed, the fit into the door opening will lock the contours of the seal in place permanently.
Steve


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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Date: April 22, 2018 07:19AM

Easy Squeezy! smoking smiley

Nice work, as usual, Steve.

Amazing how much fussy work is involved in making a Corvair! (or any 1950s-60s cars)


Dan Davis ~ Pierce County, WA ~ CORSA Western Director + Corvairs NW + North Cascades Corvairs + Corvanatics
1966 Corsa Turbo coupe ~ ~ 1966 140 Corsa ~ ~ 1965 Monza 140/4 'Vert Sierra Tan/Fawn ~ 1964 Monza 'Vert (SOLD) ~ 1960 Monza Ermine White/Red PG ++ ~ 1965 Monza 140/4 Evening Orchid w/ ivory/black interior ~ 1962 Monza Wagon 102/4 ~ 1963 Rampside/Scamper ~ 1963 Red/Greenbrier ~ 1969 Ultra Van #468

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: April 23, 2018 04:36AM

The amount of "fussy work" seems almost endless. It seems everything has it's own problem(s) and takes 5 times as long as expected. For example the horn - and we all know how fussy can be the early style horn mechanism. Almost every part needed some finessing and then finally when I got the relay to fire reliably, the horn wouldn't blow. Bad ground; you would think removing some paint would assure the bolt grounded; but noooo.... after several failures I discovered the horn would not ground if the bolt was tightened too much, for reasons I do not understand.

And speaking of fussiness, Can anyone share the secrets of getting the directional to work reliable in both directions, front and back. Despite my best efforts, I can get the front blinkers to flash but the switch does not move far enough to get both rear lights to flash. gggrrrr! It seems to me that the roller does not travel far enough along the detent spring in either direction to move the cable sufficiently.


Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Lane66m ()
Date: April 23, 2018 04:59AM

Steve: my 64 has the brackets.

Al Lane
Ellabell GA

1966 Monza Coupe, 110 hp, 4 Spd
1968 Camaro SS Coupe 350 CI 295+ HP PG
1964 Greenbrier Deluxe, 6 dr, 80 hp car engine, PG
2015 Chevrolet Malibu 2LT
2018 Chevrolet Silverado LTZ Z71 Centennial Edition
1947 Farmall A tractor 15 hp


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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: April 23, 2018 05:10AM

Bob M. reported that those rear brackets were intended to prevent the rear doors from bending the body if they struck the bumper too hard. But certainly by 1964 the door hinges had been altered to prevent the doors from striking the bumper (following earlier post-production fixes to the hinges). At a time when GM was seeking cost savings in every nut on the vehicle, why were the brackets retained, or even the bumpers?? Maybe they were intended as a general protection from impact for the rear corners?
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: April 29, 2018 05:04PM


Rear Inner panels are prepped for installation. Painted long ago, this weekend I completed installation of seals and sound installation, identified as #1 (sound insulation) and weather seals #2 & #3 in this pic:

Unfortunately, none of these are available from any of the Corvair parts venders, so I found or made replacements. For #2 I used Soffseal #9347 (1960-66 Chevy Truck front fender to cab seal); the original was stapled on, but I decided that would have been unbearably difficult, so I used weatherstrip cement. #3 is a strip of self-adhesive neoprene rubber, 1/8" thick by 1" wide. This is a very close match to the original, maybe just a little wider but fitting the space nicely. Short lengths of both are also needed for the rear corner inner panels.


The most difficult item to replace (if you want something close to stock) is the sound insulation (#1). The stock item was an asphalt impregnated fiber panel about 1/4" thick, which was notorious for peeling off and blocking air flow to the engine. I could find nothing similar, but the solution came while speaking to Clarks about the extra thick tar paper sold as front mat underlayment, which I learned is made in-house by cementing together two sheets of tar paper. I decided that if two sheets could be cemented, why not four?


The final dimensions of the sound insulation is 8" x 48", cut into two pieces that straddle the brace. So I started with 8 pieces cut 8.5" x 49".

The cement is C3735 (carpet glue), which I applied to both surfaces to be adhered. Each stack of four sheets was then clamped between boards and allowed to set up overnight. Any concerns I had about the cement adhering were unnecessary - the four sheets seem to be irreversibly welded together.

The pieces were then cut down to size with a straight edge and box cutter, and cut at the appropriate angle to contour to the support brace


I used the same cement to bind the sound insulation to the panel. I'll be installing the right side panel in the vehicle soon; the left side after I decide how to wire the antenna. Installing these panels is a job I'm not looking forward to - a real tight fit, and it's a bear to reinstall the two lower bolts.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: ac1948 ()
Date: April 30, 2018 02:53PM

Looks great. I installed one of your front mats in the 64 today. Thanks for a fine product.

Jerry Murray
Charleston, SC

63 Rampside, PG,110

63 Greenbrier, PG, 110

64 Rampside, 110, 4 speed

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: May 09, 2018 04:10AM

Headliner is up - looks great.




Clarks says it’s a two-person job, but I didn’t see the need. For each segment I first supported it in place with thin wooden strips, and with some heavy duty magnets that really locked it in place.



Notice the masking tape on the roof bows to protect them from the adhesive.



I then applied the adhesive on one side, allowed it to flash for about 5-10 minutes and then rolled it back up. Then I did the same for the other side. This system worked fine. Unfortunately, the amount of adhesive Clark’s provided was about two sections too short, so after doing some research I decided that Weldwood contact cement would work equally well. It needs to be applied more carefully and allowed to flash longer (I waited ~20 minutes) since it tends to soak more into the padding.

The cab roof was the most difficult section to apply since there is a metal plate welded in place that supports the siren.


Fitting and cutting the headliner around the plate was tricky while trying not to have the adhesive bind prematurely,

but the end result worked out well.

I also inserted the roof spotlight. I'll be reporting on the electrical soon.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: thumper477 ()
Date: May 09, 2018 05:13AM

Nice work!I would be concerned that those bolts holding the siren bracket would penetrate your skull in an accident.Maybe some flush mounted rounded bolts would be safer?

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: isucorvair ()
Date: May 09, 2018 05:45AM

thumper477 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Nice work!I would be concerned that those bolts
> holding the siren bracket would penetrate your
> skull in an accident.Maybe some flush mounted
> rounded bolts would be safer?


As an FC driver myself...I'm worried about lots more in an accident than the bolts.

We always tell people - 'you're the first at the scene of the accident, in an FC'.

Eric P.
DeWitt, IA

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: May 09, 2018 06:30AM


Since the siren and beacon light were gone when I acquired the Firebrier, I do not know exactly how they were attached. Thus, I feel at liberty to use crown nuts.


The spotlight was attached with sheet metal screws (which were standard hardware for the Unity lights), and I used these.

but I'm not thrilled with the appearnace and may place small plastic caps over the ends.
Steve




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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: May 09, 2018 07:55AM

Steve,

One word of caution on the headliner adhesives. Clarks sells the Landau adhesive. Looks like you used that. However I had issues with the Weldwood contact cement, Super trim adhesives and other commercial contact cements. When the roof gets hot in the sun, all but the Landau adhesive softens and releases. This seem to happen when the outside surface gets over 100 degrees.

I remember seeing some Vinyl roofs of the day bubbling up on the highway after they were replaced or installed at some trim shops. A friend locally has a high-end Auto trim shop. He advised me about using Landau adhesive. And as I'm sure you found out... this stuff is a "one time" bonding adhesive. It really sticks together with little or no chance to reposition!

The FC is really looking fantastic!smileys with beer


Corventure Dave

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: junkman ()
Date: May 09, 2018 08:47AM

Had you removed the spotlight before installing the headliner, you could have just cut a small hole for the shaft to go down through it, and then reinstalled the handle. At one point, Unity made a chrome trim that would go on the inside, and had tapped holes that would accept machine screws.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: May 09, 2018 09:03AM

Hi Dave,
Yeah, I'm aware of that issue. The specs say Weldwood holds up to ~180oF, which is possible on a roof baking in the sun. I read reports of it holding up well for headliners - but clearly not in your experience. I'll test, if there's a problem, I'll redo the rear two panels.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: junkman ()
Date: May 09, 2018 09:51AM

Sorry Steve... I didn't notice the second picture, and the one in the first post appeared that you cut the headliner. Saw the wire, and thought it was a cut in the headliner. Looking great. Junk

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: cad-kid ()
Date: May 09, 2018 10:38AM

Awesome work!

Jeremy (cad-kid)
Kronenwetter, WI (Central Wisconsin)
CORSA Member#031129
SOLD-9-2016 65 Monza 4spd/140
My 65 Monza thread
My YouTube page yawning smiley

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: May 09, 2018 03:22PM


I backed the Firebrier halfway out of the garage this afternoon while I worked on the front end (bumper and electrical) and let it bake in the sun. It hit about 85oC today, and I kept the windows and doors shut. I used my infrared temperature reader periodically, and over about a 2 hour period the temperature on the outer surface of the roof was between 160oF and 168oF.

The temperature reading on the inner surface of the rear headliner panel was 155oF. I saw no evidence of loosening or sagging of the panels; even if I tried to manually tug on the headliner. So far so good for contact cement.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: May 09, 2018 04:16PM

Junk,
I wish the spotlight that came with the Firebrier had an inside escutcheon. But it didn't, so neither did the NOS replacement.
Steve

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Current Page: 24 of 27


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