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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 01, 2017 06:01PM


The finish body work on the Firebrier had begun in earnest at the New Weihl Body Shop. Both the owner, Rick, and his brother Glen are on the job.

The first stage is to do several rounds of block sanding. The black paint is called a glide coat, which is block sanded to reveal any low points and dimples that will need to be filled. And they have found several.


Here's Glen blocking the right side. (It's called block sanding because a long-rigid sanding 'block' is used.) Even the door that was test-painted to select the body color has been block sanded.

Although I delivered the Firebrier with epoxy and high build primers, it will need to be reprimed after this first round of sanding. Then it will be reblock sanded and primed again, and then given the final wet sanding before applying the color. If all goes well about two weeks till finish painting will begin.

The system for repainting the lettering has also been "dry-run".

Special gold enamel will be used, sprayed on stencils that reproduce the original lettering. I forgot to photograph the stencil, an adhesive vinyl into which the lettering was cut in negative. I created for this trial, but here is the successful end result. Part of the skill I had to learn was how to apply the stencil so that it can be repositioned as needed. I'll show the details when the final lettering is done.

Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: December 01, 2017 06:15PM

Maybe a typo,but the guys are doing it right with the "guide" coat!
You and the Firebrier seem to be in good hands. How exciting it must be.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 01, 2017 06:36PM

Correct "guide coat"! Not a typo - my misspelling smiling smiley
Thanks for the correction.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: December 01, 2017 07:09PM

I've always been curious as to the steps of repainting a van with 8 doors and 12 pronounced hinges,with new hinge seals that (I'm assuming) slide over the newly painted hinges without upsetting door alignment.
Can you describe the best methods for this?

Word is,Clark's door seals are stiff and many have fought them.
How do you plan on dealing with this issue,as well?

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: MoxyRamone ()
Date: December 01, 2017 07:32PM

As a body guy, I have spent more hours than I can count block sanding. It's a ton of work, but it's the only way to go if you want a perfect finish. This one is going to be phenomenal! I have been so inspired by this thread to work on my 'vert, but my new twin boys take up all my time.

John Carver
Landrum, South Carolina

1964 Monza Convertible

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 01, 2017 07:54PM

Good questions, and this will be a tricky process due to the need to apply the lettering stencils between clear coats, for which there is a 72 hour window.

This is the plan...
The doors and hinges will be removed, obviously keeping track of original locations, and painted separately. The door openings will be masked to allow painting of the body door jambs. After painting the base coats and a single clear coat, the stencils will be applied and the lettering painted. Then additional clear coats will be applied. Finally, the doors and hinges will be reassembled with the grommets on the hinges. We are making sure ahead of time that there is an adequate space around the hinges for the grommets to fit correctly (this is often not the case).

All the doors align very well, although one is going to receive a little more work. I have the stencils carefully marked to assure alignment of the text after the doors are assembled.

At least, that's the plan.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: December 02, 2017 04:43AM

Steve. Look familiar in the engine compartment?😉 Look at this on eBay [www.ebay.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/02/2017 04:44AM by Pedigo.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 02, 2017 05:09AM

Yes, I saw that and have messaged the owner about it.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 08, 2017 06:28PM


Look what I found in old newspaper archives...

Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: December 08, 2017 06:33PM

Doesn't get more "original" than that!





MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: December 09, 2017 01:37AM

I love this historic FC geekism. thumbs up

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: toms73novass ()
Date: December 09, 2017 06:51AM

This is awesome!! thumbs upthumbs up

-Tom


63' Monza Spyder Convertable (in process) MY Build Thread
73' NovaSS 454 Big block
86' BMW 325es
98' Dodge 2500 12v Cummins Diesel with 1200 lb torque!
98' VW Jetta TDI, for daughter
01' Audi Allroad Stage 3 twin turbo

NFCC
Grand Island, NY

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 09, 2017 12:40PM

By the way, this is the photograph used to make a painting, which I originally posted back at the beginning of the thread. That picture still hangs on the wall of the firehouse.

Yeah, I guess I am a history geek, but maybe not alone - I meet many Corvair owners who are also interested in knowing about the history of their vehicle.

Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: December 09, 2017 12:52PM

A photo like that along with the original van you are working on is priceless!smileys with beer

Corventure Dave

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: December 09, 2017 01:42PM

SteveInMarietta Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

>
> Yeah, I guess I am a history geek, but maybe not
> alone - I meet many Corvair owners who are also
> interested in knowing about the history of their
> vehicle.
>
I'm right there with ya. I wished I could know the first 9 years of the Loadside history. Got all the way back to
'70 and will most likely never know.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Paulsgt ()
Date: December 09, 2017 02:30PM

I LOVE the history of these cars. I have a 61 Tempest wagon that I am effectively the 2nd owner. It was purchased new in San Diego, CA. The 66 Corsa that I had was a 2-owner car where the 2nd owner was the guy who owned the Chevy dealership where it was sold new. My 62 Monza came with the original purchase agreement and records from every owner (I am the 4th).

I guess I am a history geek.

Very cool stuff Steve.

Paul Sergeant
CORSA Central Division Director / CORSA Treasurer <-new title
Lee's Summit, MO
CORSA since 1975
Member – HACOA, Corvair Minnesota, CORSA, Little Indians, POCI



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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 14, 2017 06:53AM



Side and rear door check arms have been cleaned and restored. Here they are almost ready for installation.


4 long arms for the side doors, two short ones for the rear doors. The check arm retainer plates have been done as well, painted black on the back sides as original. I spent a good hour frantically searching for the rear door retainer plates, mystified why they weren’t with the arms, and thinking the garage gremlin had struck again. And then remembering that the retainer plates had been eliminated from the rear doors in ’63 (unlike my ’61 GB that has rear door plates). Add searching for nonexistent parts to the list of time-eaters.

Here’s one of the unrestored arms.



I failed to photograph a retainer plate before stripping, but these too, like the mounting bracket of this was arm, were painted body red. Which is interesting since it means that the check arms were installed, and partially masked, when the door jambs were painted. I wonder if the retainer plates are painted body color in other FCs with original paint – can anyone check?

As I worked on the arms it became clear how hard it would be to strip and repaint the spring area. Could be media blasted, but that doesn’t help when repainting. So I decided to dismantle them, which is actually not that difficult.


As shown above, the check arm assembly is held together by a metal pin that is slightly flared at one end to secure it in place. I realized that the flare can be easily ground off with a Dremel tool, allowing the pin to be punched out and separation of the arm and mounting bracket. When the check arms are reassembled, the pins can be easily reflared to restore the original appearance.

So here’s everything separated and stripped.


Though no serious rust, I did first electrolytically derusted several parts first, and then everything was wire wheel stripped to bare metal. Several of the pins were bent, and these were straightened. Since there is no practical way to remove the rubber wheel, stripping under them took more time, and they were masked before painting. The retainer plates above are fitted with wires by which they can be suspended when painting.



I used a large painting frame and lots of 22 gauge wire to suspend everything for painting. First painted with self-etching primer, and then with Rustoleum matte nickel enamel, or with Black Blitz for the back of the retainer plates.

After everything was painted, the arms were reassembled with the pins inserted through the springs – takes a little manual dexterity. Then working over a small anvil, and using a metal punch and hammer, the ends of the pins were reflared.



Here’s one after a little flattening. Fortunately it doesn’t take much flare to lock the pin in place.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Nickshu ()
Date: December 14, 2017 07:16AM

Nice work Steve!

Nick
_______________________________________________________________________
1964 Monza Spyder Convertible #435 - Rotisserie restored - Check out my restoration thread here: [corvaircenter.com]
Recreational Mechanic/CORSA Member/COG Supporting Member/US Navy Veteran
Northern Colorado, USA

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: igottajob2 ()
Date: December 14, 2017 08:54AM

Your attention to detail is quite amazing! smileys with beer

Minneapolis,MN

1965 500 Coupe
95HP

Built the 1st week of April of 65 at willow run.
500 coupe. The only factory accessory is a rear antenna.
White with a red interior.
Now black with black and red interior.


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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 30, 2017 05:12AM


Progress and a setback in Firebrier restoration.

The finish painting has progressed, and shown here is the base paint applied to left side and rear, with the plan to paint and apply the lettering in stages.


The base coat on the rear quarter panel has been scuffed to facilitate adhesion of the gold lettering enamel and then the subsequent clear coats. At least that was the plan.

The original lettering is going to be replicated as closely as possible. The lettering had been originally hand painted with gold enamel (the original brush strokes were still visible).



Preparation for relettering began shortly after acquiring the Firebrier by copying all of the text on tracing paper using a straight edge & French curves.


Overall, there are 11 text panels: 8 doors plus the front and two rear quarter panels. The tracings were then used to cut stencil silhouettes from adhesive backed vinyl. Here's the stages for one of the fire company vehicle numbers on the front doors.


The stencil was cut using the tracing as a pattern, and then after the backing was removed, the vinyl was applied to the panel. The panel and vinyl adhesive side were first sprayed with soapy water, which allowed repositioning as needed, and then the vinyl was squeegeed to remove water and secure it in place. Then any support arms are removed. Overall. 5 panels were applied; here's the vinyl applied to one of the rear doors:


All went well through the painting... until the vinyl was removed...

...when disaster struck. Unfortunately the vinyl adhesive reacted with the scuffed base coat and would not come off. If you look closely, you can see the adhesive around the letters; the vinyl adhered so tightly that in one place it pulled off the paint. So all the panels will need to be resanded and repainted. Bummer on several accounts.

This is a great example of trying to anticipate potential problems, but missing one of them. Even though we had shot a test panel and all went well...

... the lettering in this case had been painted over a couple of clear coats, and then reclear-coated several times. However, the lettering was still somewhat raised, so we decided to apply the lettering directly to the base coat; which was scuffed to assure adhesion of the enamel and subsequent clear coats. Obviously a bad idea. Oh well.

I'm weighing two choices at this point. First would be recutting the 5 vinyl panel silhouettes and painting with the gold enamel as originally planned. The other option is to have all of the lettering recut in gold vinyl (the way lettering is typically applied to commercial vehicles these days). Rick, my body shop guy, believes that he can reproduce all of the original panels almost exactly using his lettering software and computer-guided laser vinyl cutter. In some regards this can yield a better final result. He is going to prepare a test panel and we'll then decide how to proceed.

Steve

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