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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: November 08, 2017 06:44PM

SteveInMarietta Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I see no use for the Hanson clincher in the
> foreseeable future, and you're welcome to use it.
> Steve


Thank you(and thank you again)for the new toy that I received today.drinking smiley
In return,here is a pic of those NOS FC seat adjuster screws for your build thread.smoking smiley

Sometimes,it's the little things.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 08, 2017 07:35PM

"any issue with new channels sticking out further than the stock ones"
Edward, do you mean the beaded face sticks out to far? I haven't installed these back in the van, but the channels look to be a close match to the originals; and when I rebuilt the vent assemblies for my 61 GB there was no problem with the fit. I purchased the channels from Clarks.

T, Granted it's a double cab VW pickup, but thought it would bring you good memories. Nice looking adjuster screws - thanks also.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 09, 2017 01:30AM


When I rebuilt the steering linkage I was able to replace everything except the connecting rod assembly (draglink arm).


Clarks carried everything except the long forward tie rod end - GM 3782920 or the Moog replacement (ES-633) seem to be unobtanium - although they offer a substitute complete assembly that is machined from other parts.

Miraculously I was able to find a NOS ES-633, and to complete the linkage, a NOS adjusting sleeve (3740858), and the short tie rod end.



However, the short tie rod end I obtained is ES-297L, which is threaded for proper turnbuckle action in the adjusting sleeve. Yet this table that has been posted before says that the short tie rod is ES-297R

which I would assume has the reverse threading and thus would not fit correctly.

Maybe the table is incorrect, or maybe the MOOG adjusting sleeve ES-312S is threaded differently than the original GM sleeve. But at any rate, should anyone care, ES-297L works with the original GM sleeve

Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: junkman ()
Date: November 09, 2017 03:41AM

What did you do for a replacement boomerang?

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 09, 2017 05:07AM

The boomerang was in good shape and didn't need to be replaced.

Dirty as all get out (but not as bad as some I've seen), and with a good tight idler joint; the center pivot moved smoothly with new grease.

It was cleaned, primed and repainted. The arm was painted with Eastwood Spray Gray and the mounting bracket with Blitz Black; the rear caps of the idler joint and center pivot were painted with Eastwood Detail Gray.

Considering the Firebrier has only ~16 K miles on the odometer, no surprise the relay arm is in good shape.

Actually, the drag link is also in pretty good shape as well, but I want to replace it so that I can move the Firebrier's original Drag link to my '61 Greenbrier, which could use a replacement.
Steve


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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: cepak ()
Date: November 09, 2017 05:47AM

So have you been keeping track of the number of man hours this restoration is taking you?


Tom Cepak
Fort Worth, TX

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 09, 2017 06:02AM

No - too scary to think about! The labor involved in a contracted full restoration can be the greater part of the cost; and I know I could never afford to pay someone to do this.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: junkman ()
Date: November 09, 2017 07:44AM

Had I known how difficult it was to find all the front end parts, I would have taken them all from the Greenbrier Amblewagon ambulance that was in the salvage yard in PA. I learned about that car from another Corvair owner (name forgotten) after he picked it for the parts that he wanted. I pulled the carburetors, boomerang, axles, steering box, and a bunch of small parts. I remember it was a very hot fall day, and I was totally exhausted by the time that I had gotten all the parts that I wanted. That Corvair only had 3000 miles on it, but was rusty from sitting outside for 20 years. By the standards of the day, it wasn't worth saving, however, today some might think it was worth saving. When I look at the amount of work that you are doing on your car, this one would have been half that amount. In the end, your car will be better than new. There is always that pride that you get when you are able to say that you did it all yourself.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: cepak ()
Date: November 09, 2017 08:19AM

SteveInMarietta Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> No - too scary to think about! The labor involved
> in a contracted full restoration can be the
> greater part of the cost; and I know I could never
> afford to pay someone to do this.
> Steve

Like Jay Leno said "If you are making money at restoring classic cars then you aren't doing it right".


Tom Cepak
Fort Worth, TX

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 17, 2017 06:47PM


The Firebrier will also have a newly reproduced rear (load area) mat.

to accompany the front mat that was previously reproduced.

Repop'ing the rear mat was challenging due to its size (60" x 69") and lack of a good quality original. Much thanks to Dale Dewald for providing a used mat that was good enough. The forward area was in rough shape.

and rearward there were many lost pieces and tears.

First I had to build a large flat reinforced platform upon which the mat could be secured. As for the front mat, flattening the mat is essential. This is the bottom of the platform


The mat was then glued to the surface of the platform, annealing the tears as best possible. Then all the damaged areas were carefully patched with pieces cut from other mats. Here's the forward area after restoration. Most of this was replaced with a chunk of the mat from the Firebrier. That's a level resting in the center of the mat.

In the rearward area, especially around the seat mounting bracket cutouts, old damaged mat was cut out and replaced. You can see a white putty that was used to fill cracks.

As you can see, a wood frame was constructed around the mat to retain the epoxy used to create the mold. The mat was sprayed with a release agent, and then covered with several gallons of epoxy, which was allowed to cure for 36 hours.

However, before the epoxy was fully cured, the mold was very carefully separated from the mat. This is best done while the mold has some flexibility.


The next challenge was to flip this huge mold over without breaking it. To do so, another flat panel was clamped over it, so that the whole platform could be tipped up

and then lowered upside down, releasing the mold onto the second panel,

which was then moved back onto the platform.

The next step was to make repairs in the mold. Seams along the edges of patches, particularly in the mat borders, are visible and I have worked out a technique to essentially make these disappear. Finally, after shimming to get the mold perfectly level, and applying a release agent, the mold was cast with several gallons of an industrial grade urethane rubber:

Which was pealed from the mold after 12 hours of curing.

The repro mat is shown in the first image, and I believe it's even better than the front mat. The openings for the mounting brackets for the rear (third) seat, are an optional cut out.

I don't know how much interest there will be among FC owners because these repros will be expensive, but I plan to make one batch if anyone wants one. The mats will cost $350 + shipping. Shipping even in the US will around $50 (the boxes alone will cost ~$15 each). So if you want one let me know.

The mold and platform (73" x 69", and weighing a 'ton') are currently filling a large area of my garage, and I see no place where I can store it long-term. So I'll probably need to get rid of it eventually.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: November 17, 2017 08:16PM

Put me down for one,Steve!

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: fred bagnall ()
Date: November 17, 2017 08:55PM

My front mat is in great condition, but my rear mat could use some love. Put me down for a repro rear mat. Thanks for offering another great unobtanium part. Kudos to you Steve.


64 Greenbrier std -110, 4spd,barn find on the road again after 46 year hiatus.
66 Turbo Corsa, 180hp,posi-trac, quick steering HD suspension,AM-FM-multiplex,soft-Ray glass all around
Floridian currently residing in Nor Cal

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: November 18, 2017 08:24AM

P.S. If you end up with any urethane waste or scraps large enough to fill the front bench mounting holes,feel free to throw them in the box. Ill trim them to size as plugs for the Corvan floor.
Thanks for making unobtanium again!smileys with beer

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 18, 2017 12:52PM

I will make inserts for the front seat bracket holes.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 19, 2017 05:17AM


Back in a February post I had shown how a number of parts were given a new rubber coating (clips, spark plug wire retainer, etc.). Here's another one. Beginning in 1963 the rather elaborate checkarms of the FC rear engine access door were deleted (cost savings) and replaced with chains. The chains were originally rubberized, most of which was gone from those of the Firebrier. Having some extra polyurethane from the aforementioned projects, I used it to recoat the chains.


It takes a bit of work to adequately clean and derust the chains first (tough to use a wire wheel), but end result resembles the original.

Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: November 19, 2017 05:31AM

Looks great,but the chains started in '62.winking smiley

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 19, 2017 05:45AM

Dah! You are absolutely correctomundo!
Thanks.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: November 19, 2017 05:56AM

Glad to help,Steve.
Not to sidetrack your build thread,but I learned another new tidbit yesterday.
The square punch-outs for the nylon licence plate holders are larger on the '61 rear engine access door than the post-'62.

Another "one year only" for '61.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/19/2017 05:57AM by Pedigo.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: November 19, 2017 06:22AM

Interesting, Definitely not OT! I had noted when working on the Firebrier front end that the nylon inserts looked different than what I remembered for the '61; but never having the two GBs at the same place at the same time, I failed to compare. Might the later style holes receive the same inserts as used for the side door bumpers?

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: November 21, 2017 08:53AM

Steve, your floor mat work is beyond amazing!thumbs up

smileys with beer

Corventure Dave

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Current Page: 19 of 21


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