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Current Page: 13 of 20
Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Date: December 23, 2016 10:39AM

Hardware store sells 18ga Aluminum Wire. Perfect! Easy to bend looks great installed. The only reason the original wire was so tough - it was pounded thru two pieces of sheet steel! Once the holes are there, a lightweight staple holds the pieces together just fine.



Just use a small drill to pierce the rubber membrane easily while holding the assembly of the shroud, membrane and retainer clamped together.




Dan Davis ~ Pierce County, WA ~ CORSA Western Director + Corvairs NW + North Cascades Corvairs + Corvanatics
1966 Corsa Turbo coupe ~ ~ 1966 140 Corsa ~ ~ 1965 Monza 140/4 'Vert Sierra Tan/Fawn ~ 1964 Monza 'Vert (SOLD) ~ 1960 Monza Ermine White/Red PG ++ ~ 1965 Monza 140/4 Evening Orchid w/ ivory/black interior ~ 1962 Monza Wagon 102/4 ~ 1963 Rampside/Scamper ~ 1963 Red/Greenbrier ~ 1969 Ultra Van #468

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 23, 2016 11:02AM

I hope anyone planning to do this in the future first reads this thread.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Lane66m ()
Date: December 23, 2016 11:10AM

Cool weather keeping me from painting my engine tins. Once I can get a couple warm days above 70, then I will do my tin refurbishment. still looking for a way to do painting on these cool days.

Al Lane
Ellabell GA

1966 Monza Coupe, 110 hp, 4 Spd
1966 Corsa Turbo Coupe, 180 hp 4 Spd
1964 Greenbrier Deluxe, 6 dr, 80 hp car engine, PG
2015 Chevrolet Malibu 2LT
2015 GMC Sierra SLT Crew Cab
1968 Camaro SS Coupe 350 CI 295+ HP PG
1947 Farmall A tractor 15 hp


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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 23, 2016 11:15AM

Al,
What about powder coating?
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: December 23, 2016 02:31PM

Steve

Do you have additional pics that can show others the orientation of the flappers,as it pertains to full heat,etc?
I'm considering removing the fresh-air heater/blower box assembly and yours is the only "cut-away" (for lack of a better term) that I've seen.

Thanks

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: flamingchariots ()
Date: December 23, 2016 06:32PM

I would stay away from aluminum wire because it fatigues very easily... quickly cracks and breaks.
I believe normal engine vibrations would result in having to re-do your fasteners.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 24, 2016 01:06AM

T,
Were you looking for a view different than the ones I posted on October 15 (page 9)?
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Lane66m ()
Date: December 24, 2016 04:47AM

Great views, Steve. Photos have everything needed to make sure tins zre right and seals properly installed. I will be printing them and posting them on my garage wall to reference when I get working on my van engine tins.

I am looking at powder coating, but have not bought an old electric stove to do the baking. The big pieces would still needed to be outsourced. I have the gun now, awaiting ordering paint until I have the stove. Can you PM me the info on the paint you used? Thank you.

Al Lane
Ellabell GA

1966 Monza Coupe, 110 hp, 4 Spd
1966 Corsa Turbo Coupe, 180 hp 4 Spd
1964 Greenbrier Deluxe, 6 dr, 80 hp car engine, PG
2015 Chevrolet Malibu 2LT
2015 GMC Sierra SLT Crew Cab
1968 Camaro SS Coupe 350 CI 295+ HP PG
1947 Farmall A tractor 15 hp


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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: December 24, 2016 04:52AM

Al, most decent sized powder coating companies are likely to do it cheaper (and better) than what you could do it yourself. I provided media blasted shrouds and the power coating, matte black, cost $100.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: January 06, 2017 05:27PM


Doing a lot of detail work removing the final traces of the Firebrier’s undercoating, hoping to prime and paint within a week. As in the rear, a few undercarriage body repairs will still be needed. Some of those repairs are awaiting arrival of replacement body parts – weird west coast weather is not helping – but I’ve made some repairs that needed fabrication.

I should have expected that even though it was well undercoated, the bottom for the front cowl would be rotted since water can get in through the front grille. Here’s images of the left and center sections of the under cowl (there was somewhat less rot on the right side)


Where to cut the panel can be a tough decision with several compromises. Ideally the replacement piece is as small as possible requiring the easiest fabrication, but obviously large enough to weld to decent metal, which can be hard to judge when you can’t see the back side. However, when working in tight spaces like this, it’s also necessary that the seam will be accessible to the welder (I use a Mig) and later by a grinder to smooth the weld. As you can see here for the left side, after I removed the panel and did some cleaning, the inside of the cowl was painted with POR-15, masking the edges where welding will occur.

I fabricated replacement panels using 20 ga steel. It takes a lot of metal work to replicate the original pieces. Here’s the left side replacement before drilling the holes in the bottom lip; several holes were also drilled for plug welds. The back sides of replacement panels are treated with weld-through primer.

Fitting the replacement into place can be tricky, especially in tight spaces like this, and using several strong magnets helps. My method for getting a good fit is to initially make the replacement slightly larger than the hole, and then remove the excess old metal by cutting along the edge of the replacement with a Dremel tool (409 or 420 cut off blades work well), and spot welding the pieces as I go along. This assures a tight fit between the pieces, and the spot welds hold the piece in place. Hopefully, a continuous weld can be applied without blowing through any old metal, but that rarely occurs in my universe.

Here are the two panels with the welds ground down. I use a 4 1/2“ angle grinder, where accessible, and a Dremel tool with fiber impregnated cut off wheels.


I use All Metal filler to smooth the surface of the welds and fill any pin holes. This stuff is rock hard and water proof. I went ahead and applied primer so that I can better assess the final appearance.



Another repair has been to the left side rear intermediate side door jamb, which was rotted on both sides. The picture of the back side shows the bracing below the hinge, most of which was beyond saving.
No hope for replacement body parts here - a left side door jamb – since there aren’t many (any?) 8-door FCs being parted out these days; so fabrication is necessary.


As explained above, several factors were considered when choosing where to cut the old metal, and how to piece together the replacements, such as being able to reweld in suitable places. Here, there is another issue… being sure not to loosen/alter the position of the hinge mount, which could screw up positioning of the door.

The lower extension of the cut was made in order to remove some of the rotted metal behind it.

Here’s two of the refabricated pieces. The large one will form the inside face of the jamb and a vertical brace in the rear. Note that body screw nuts are being replaced, and holes are provided where plug welds will replace spot welds.

Overall, seven pieces were required, which included repairs to the exterior skin below the jamb.

Here, replacement parts are being installed. I had to plan carefully the order in which the pieces will be installed so that appropriate welds could be made, and ground down – I intend that the restoration will not be apparent on either side.

During the repair, the upper hinge was not removed and the door was supported from below. Before I made some final welds, the lower hinge was reinstalled and I confirmed that the door would still shut correctly.

Here's the completed repair after applying epoxy primer.


I don’t know about you all, but I’m much better at pulling out tools as I need them than putting them away when I’m done. Which, inevitably soon results is a chaotic mess of tools, debris, and electrical cords, within which I can never find what I need when I need it.


Steve


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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Date: January 06, 2017 07:04PM

Steve,
You are the Metal Maven! thumbs up Some great fabrication and welding work, sir.
Thank you also for providing your detailed reference as you perform this work.
My original San Diego Greenbrier also has some rust issues! This will be a big help when I get around to slicing and dicing the repairs on mine. smileys with beer


Dan Davis ~ Pierce County, WA ~ CORSA Western Director + Corvairs NW + North Cascades Corvairs + Corvanatics
1966 Corsa Turbo coupe ~ ~ 1966 140 Corsa ~ ~ 1965 Monza 140/4 'Vert Sierra Tan/Fawn ~ 1964 Monza 'Vert (SOLD) ~ 1960 Monza Ermine White/Red PG ++ ~ 1965 Monza 140/4 Evening Orchid w/ ivory/black interior ~ 1962 Monza Wagon 102/4 ~ 1963 Rampside/Scamper ~ 1963 Red/Greenbrier ~ 1969 Ultra Van #468

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: igottajob2 ()
Date: January 09, 2017 10:09AM

THis is amazing. Such great work. smileys with beer

Minneapolis,MN

1965 500 Coupe
95HP

Built the 1st week of April of 65 at willow run.
500 coupe. The only factory accessory is a rear antenna.
White with a red interior.
Now black with black and red interior.


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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: January 09, 2017 04:15PM

All Hail the mighty power of a Dremel Tool!thumbs up

One of the most useful tools I have for fabricating and other detailing.
I have a diamond wheel in mine right now to do special angle cuts on the next phase of ceramic tiles I am installing in the house.smileys with beer

Corventure Dave

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: January 09, 2017 04:20PM

One of these days I will buy a good quality flexible extension shaft for my Dremel tool. A cheap one I bought recently came from China, and within 10 minutes the shaft broke.
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: January 12, 2017 08:19PM


It's Done, essentially; the undercarriage, that is. Front half is now stripped, primed and repainted. A few pics:

Front wheel well after / before :


pedal bushing brackets after / before:


center undercarriage after / before priming


It took a lot of work to clean all the crevices, such as around the gas filler opening


Essentially done, because there is still some body work to be done.

In summary, here's the steps I followed to remove the undercoating and refinish.
1. Remove bulk of UCing; heat and vibratory tool or dry ice and scraper.
2. Remove bulk of residual UCing and undercarriage paint: airplane stripper and lots of wire brushes. (I used about 3 gallons of stripper.)
3. Remove residual stripper and additional UCing: diesel fuel, scouring pads and lots of wire brushes. (I used about 3 gallons of diesel fuel.)
4. Degrease: POR 15 degreaser and various brushes and scouring pads. Spray off with water. (I used about 1/2 gallon of degreaser.)
5. Metal Prep: POR 5 Metal Prep. Spray off with water. (I used about 3/4 gallon metal prep.)
6. Remove remaining UCing from nooks and crevices: spray with isopropyl alcohol and more wire brushes. (I used about 1/2 gallon alcohol, and overall, about 75 small wire brushes)
7. Rust treat: POR 15, only on areas with surface rust.
8. Prime: Omni 170 epoxy primer after POR 15 is slightly tacky but not yet cured.
9. Paint!!!: PPG DCC Acrylic Enamel; before primer cures.
[10. Go back and touch up finish paint ]

I wore a full face respirator when using the stripper and when priming and painting; and replaced the filters 5 times - whenever I found fumes leaking through.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: January 12, 2017 08:29PM

Lot of work...but a great refinish!





MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: Pedigo ()
Date: January 12, 2017 08:34PM

Holy Hell,Steve! Would you be willing to restore the Loadside?
If given the choice on restoration shops,and the wherewithal,..."YOU" are the top of my list!

Amazing work,Brother.

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: January 12, 2017 08:44PM

Thanks Matt and Thomas.
I'm cursed with the belief that I can do many things cheaper and better than someone I would pay to do it; and thus, can't bear to pay someone a lot of money to do mediocre work.
TP - will you be driving the Loadside to Ohio anytime soon? (We've got less snow!)
Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: SteveInMarietta ()
Date: January 12, 2017 09:02PM


And here's a recent acquisition - the original siren from the Firebrier!!



It was generously gifted by someone from the Malden West Camp Fire Company. This is a Federal Siren 66G siren - a monster of siren - and can be seen in the original painting of the Firebrier (back on thread page 1). Overall, it's in excellent condition. I'm looking into having it restored.


Steve

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Re: FC Fire Dept Truck Restoration
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: January 13, 2017 09:26AM

Absolutely phenomenal work and outstanding craftsmanship!thumbs upthumbs upthumbs up

I love so see this kind of proud detail. It's rarely found these days. And yes... I also believe, almost like you.. that I can do every bit as "bad" a job as the so called professionals!winking smiley Most of the time I like to think I can do better.
The gratification when finished is huge.drinking smiley

We can hardly wait to see how the top side of this Fc turns out.smileys with beer

Coventure Dave

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Current Page: 13 of 20


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