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Powdercoated part -Your comments
Posted by: Tom Rahochik ()
Date: February 22, 2005 06:26PM

A friend of mine elected to have his stock oil pan on his 66 Corsa powdercoated satin black. When he brought it home, he noticed it was powdercoated on the inside as well as the outside. He wants to know if there would be any breakdown of this paint internally with the hot oil which will always be in contact with the inside of the oil pan over the many years he plans to drive his vehicle. Comments?


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Re: Powdercoated part -Your comments
Posted by: Larry Forman ()
Date: February 22, 2005 06:43PM

Hi Tom,
OK, let's just pretend that your "friend" is not YOU! LOL.

He made a mistake in my opinion, but not what you were hinting at. The oil pan is supposed to radiate and convect some or a lot of the heat from the oil. Painting just the outside would be bad for starters since it would tend to reduce the amount of cooling air striking the aluminum surface. It would essentially place an insulator on that radiating and convecting surface, since powder coating is really just plastic particles that are melted onto the surface to form a coating. Now he compounded this error by placing another insulating layer on the inside. Since the powder coating is formed by heating it, as long as you don't exceed the max plastic temperature it will be fine. The bottom of the oil pan should be OK as far as the powder coating coming off in service.

Actually, bare and not shiny aluminum would have been much better. If he had just sandblasted it to make the surface rougher and essentially more surface area, he would have been much better off.

How much has this hurt the cooling, who knows? More thermodynamic and cooling analysis than I care to do. I would now recommend he take as many precautions as possible to get everything else cooling well. For some ideas, search this site for "cooling" or "deflash" and see what you get. Several of us have posted many of the common and sometimes uncommon approaches to improved cooling.

Good luck to your "friend". gggg
-- Larry

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Re: Powdercoated part -Your comments
Posted by: Harry Moore ()
Date: February 23, 2005 05:34PM

I saw a NOS set of valve covers, they were bare metal. No wonder the concours people don't want to drive their cars. The surface rust on them would start as soon as they drove through a puddle! smiling smiley
Harry

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Re: Powdercoated part -Your comments
Posted by: Phil Fairman ()
Date: February 24, 2005 08:00AM

Harry,

Actually, both the valve covers and the pan were originally some variation of cadinum plate...inside and out, only when exposed to corrosives like salt would they start to rust....eventually, over time, the blast of grit from the road would erode the cad plate and expose the bare steel, hence the rust. If you look inside of a original valve cover, even if caked with oil crud, the cad plate remains. As far as painting or powdercoating stock valve covers or oil pans, keep whatever coating you use on the outside only, it's not needed inside. I have seen replacement factory valve covers painted black and silver...also orange, but cannot verify if the orange was original. I don't think that the factory was concerned about cooling, especially with valve covers, when they cad plated them, it was just cheaper than painting. I have a Clark's finned aluminum pan and silver powdercoated valve covers on my '66. The pan is natural finish and the covers are coated only on the outside...I had concerns about the powdercoat eventually peeling or coming off and clogging up oil passages, the oil film protects the inside just fine. A good, clean oil cooler is more important to cooling than coatings on the pan & covers...also, synthetic oil does run cooler by 15-30 degrees in most engines. I really like the Clark's pan because the oil drain is in the rear and I can drain the oil without getting under the car.

Cheers,
Phil Fairman
'66 Monza Coupe 110/pg

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Re: Powdercoated part -Your comments
Posted by: Harry Moore ()
Date: February 24, 2005 08:02PM

Phil,
Thanks for the clarification, my bad.
Harry

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