Corvair DiagramCorvair Photo
Corvair Center
home forum corvairs calendar links Corvair Podcast
California Corvairs
Clarks Corvair
Clarks Corvair
“Performance
“CORSA"



Chevy Corvair License Plate
Chevy Corvair Chrome Wheel
Corvair Center Forum :  Corvair Center Phorum The fastest message board... ever.
Corvair Center 
Pages: 123Next
Current Page: 1 of 3
Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: JP_REX ()
Date: November 16, 2014 02:47PM

Hi Everyone,
I thought I would post some info about installing a shifter bushing kit on my 67 coupe. Hoping to tighten up the very sloppy shifter, I bought one of the Clark's shifter kits which included their bronze shifter bushings and a shift coupler.

I jacked up the car, pulled off the tunnel cover, disconnected the shifter fork, pulled out the shift coupler, and left the car overnight. The next morning the garage smelled like gear oil (nasty!). I can't understand why it chose that moment to start, but the shift rod seal on the transmission was leaking. I think it was leaking very slightly prior to that, but the leak grew substantially overnight.

Fortunately, the Clark's shifter kit included a new shifter rod seal, so I replaced it. The old seal was not easy to remove, but it eventually came out by drilling a hole in the steel face and hammering the hole tangentially with a screwdriver to get the seal to rotate (i.e. to loosen the bond between the outside of the seal and the transmission bore). Once it was spinning in the bore, I was able to pull it out.

The bronze shifter bushing kit was not easy to install. Clark's says 1-2 hours, but that wasn't my experience. I had to sand the shifter shaft substantially to get it smooth enough to slide through the bushings and then, once the bushings were installed in the tube, I had to sand the inside of the bushings to get them loose enough for the rod to slide freely.

My next discovery was that the shifter fork from Clark's was about 1" longer than the original. I couldn't get the fork to slide up into the shifter rod enough to compensate for the extra 1", so I had to cut the excess off.

Since I had dripped out an unknown amount of MT oil and I had heard of the incompatibility of GL-5 oil with the Corvair transmission (thanks to Richard1), I decided to drain and refill the transmission. My hand vacuum pump was able to start a siphon and drain the fluid. I then went to Ford and bought their Synthetic GL-4 gear oil that Richard1 recommended. It was made in Germany - two quarts for $50! GL-4 is pretty hard to get, so I just felt fortunate to find it on short notice.

The entire job was a lot more work than I expected, but the shifter is much improved. There were no plastic bushings remaining in the old tube, so I'm not surprised it was so floppy before. I can actually feel the transmission go into gear, and I can tell if I'm in gear by the feel of the shifter.

John
67 Coupe 110/4-spd

Link to Thread about Transmission Oil

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: steve c goodman ()
Date: November 16, 2014 02:59PM

I rebuild lots of shifters. I always have to polish the inner tube with wire wheel and then sandpaper. I have had to use a file to smooth the high spots caused by rust buildup. I use a ball hone to fit the bronze bushings to the od of the shifter. Remember too that correct alignment of the coupler to the trans shift shaft is critical for a smooth motion. I end up having to straighten many of the shift rods too. Isn't working on old cars fun? At least having it work nicely afterward is fun.

best wishes, Steve
Rear Engine Spec. Inc. Golden, Colo.

1962 spyder 3.0L turbo 1965 Crown V8
1967 monza 110/4 1968 monza 110/4
1971 amante gt 110/4
CORSA/RMC/PPCC

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: 66vairman ()
Date: November 16, 2014 03:24PM

Hardly a two hour job John and a good description.

Steve said you have to hone the bushing. The bushing I.D. is the same as the shift rod O.D. (allowing for tolerances). I use a small brake wheel cylinder hone, typically for foreign cars.

Usually the inner shifter tube is bent, rusty, and sometimes oval! When you are done it is worth it. Amazing how many "bad shifting" Corvairs are out there when some parts and labor will take care of it.


Steve, do you have a brand name and part number for the small ball hone you used?

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: davemotohead ()
Date: November 16, 2014 03:28PM

I use Bushings from my hardware store that fit great,I hone the inside as well to get a perfect fit, that's Why I get 3rd gear posi rubber!smoking smiley

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: bmarsh52 ()
Date: November 16, 2014 03:55PM

Sears Hardware has the correct bushing for $4.99. Their part number is 58105. They also has a great selection of grade 8 fasteners, SS fasteners and a bunch of bushings, e clips and other hard to find parts.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: steve c goodman ()
Date: November 16, 2014 04:28PM

66vairman Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
>
> Steve, do you have a brand name and part number
> for the small ball hone you used?

Steve sez: I have ball hones from .312" for VW valve guides up to 4" for cylinders. They can be bought from any machine shop supplier. You said you used wheel cylinder hone, I have ball hones for wheel cylinder and master cylinders diameters too.


Lb

best wishes, Steve
Rear Engine Spec. Inc. Golden, Colo.

1962 spyder 3.0L turbo 1965 Crown V8
1967 monza 110/4 1968 monza 110/4
1971 amante gt 110/4
CORSA/RMC/PPCC

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: Allan Lacki ()
Date: November 17, 2014 06:06AM

Over the years, I've installed new bronze bushings in three shifter tubes, and I've always had a devil of a time getting the shift rod to slide easily through the bushings. They always seem to bind. The shift rods were rusty, bent, or both, making it necessary to spend time straightening, grinding, sanding, polishing and reaming out the rods and the bushings.

So, I began to think it would be easier to make a new shift rod using stainless steel tubing. It is simple to re-use the fabricated mild-steel end piece from a '66-'69 Corvair shift rod. The fabricated end has two sockets, one on each end. One socket is occupied by the existing tube. The other socket is empty. So, chop off the old tube from the one socket and weld the new tube to the empty socket. Then, slit the other end of the new tube just like the old one, so that the shift rod coupler can be clamped into it.

Rather than just talk about it, I proceeded to make a stainless steel shift rod for myself. I ordered a .75" (OD) x .620" (ID) x 58.25" piece of stainless steel tubing from Speedy Metals (online) and took it to a local welding shop to have it welded to the fabricated mild steel socket from the original shift rod. I haven't notched the rod at the rear just yet, but that will be easy. A photo is attached.

In addition to the shift rod, the photo also shows the flange bearings that I'm using. Like everybody else, I had to hone them, but wow, do they slide back and forth nice and easy on that stainless steel tubing! Al

Attachments:
Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: Allan Lacki ()
Date: November 17, 2014 06:19AM

Hello Again JP_REX, I am surprised that you had difficulty with the length of the Clark's shift coupler. I recently ordered one, and found that it was the correct length for any '66 to '69 Corvair with a manual transmission.

The shaft of the coupler on earlier Corvairs, from 1961 to 1965, is about 1 inch shorter than the later ones. But even so, it should inside the shift "rod", (which is really a tube), just fine. That is why Clark's lists only one kind of shift coupler for all of the years from 1961 through 1969. The 1960 Corvair had a different coupler, and Clark's stocks one for the '60 Corvairs, too.

Now, I should point out that I am writing about the stock style shift coupler that Clark sells. Clark's also sells a billet-style shift coupler that is very nicely made. I installed one in my personal Corvair, and I had to extend the "slot" in on the coupler shaft because the slot wasn't long enough. Apparently, it was machined for a 1961-1965 Corvair. Mine is a ''66. But luckily, it is made of aluminum, so it was easy to mill the slot an extra inch or two longer.

Attached is a photo which shows a pair of factory stock shift couplers. The shorter one is from a 1961-1965 Corvair. The longer one is from a 1966-1969 Corvair.

Also attached is a photo of the Clark's billet shift coupler, which I believe is manufactured by Ray Sedman of American Pi. Al

Attachments:

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: JamesD ()
Date: November 17, 2014 07:06AM

John, Motohead has a really neat and easy way to remove those shifter rod seals. I don't remember whether I've seen it in a video, but I've seen it in real life.

He's normally pretty shy, but perhaps this will encourage him to talk about it or show a video.

James Deplorable
'65 Corsa 4-speed, '65 Corsa V8                                                       Santa Clarita, CA.
“I may not always drive a car, but when I do, I prefer a Corvair.  Stay loose, my friends.”

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: County98 ()
Date: November 17, 2014 07:55AM

I'm getting ready to have to do this as well. I would love to see a nice easy way to change that seal!

Dave?...

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: davemotohead ()
Date: November 17, 2014 07:59AM

Easy! just take 2 sharp drywall screws and screw them into the steel seal shell,Grab some pliers and you can leverage it right out!thumbs up





Email me at: Dave Motohead

1960 4dr sedan caveman car
1961 Rampside (Chetside)
1962 Rampside (Barnside)
1962 Short Rampside (Shortside)
1962 Monza 700 Wagon
1963 Monza 900 coup (General Nader)




Sign my guest book!
[motoheadmall.com]
-----------------------------------
Rust Free Lancaster Ca

Attachments:
Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: County98 ()
Date: November 17, 2014 08:03AM

Twist it out?

Any tips for installing the new one? Manual doesn't mention anything, unless I missed it. Should I coat the outside in anything or just grab an appropriate sized socket and knock it back in there?

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: November 17, 2014 08:09AM

I have re-bushed the shifter tubes for years, and the cost was $0.
I keep some old steerinmg box pitman shaft bushings in my junk droor. These are the large bushings that are pressed in the lower section of the steering box.
By cutting about 3/16 lengthwise and next to the line where the bushing comes together, then crimping the bushing closed around this gap with hose clamps over the shift tube, one can size the bushinmg to the shifter shaft.
Once size is deturmined, the bushing will press securely into the outer tube.
Only takes about 10 minutes to make the steering bushing to fit the shifter tube.

See? Sometimes it pays not to throw old bushings away!eye popping smiley

Corventure Dave

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: davemotohead ()
Date: November 17, 2014 08:09AM

You just pull it straight out! put grease on the inside and a dab of gaskacinch on the out side and tap it in with a deep socket. Funny Corventure! I used a old distributor bushing yesterday! I keep all the worn out ones and Find uses for them as well!





Email me at: Dave Motohead

1960 4dr sedan caveman car
1961 Rampside (Chetside)
1962 Rampside (Barnside)
1962 Short Rampside (Shortside)
1962 Monza 700 Wagon
1963 Monza 900 coup (General Nader)




Sign my guest book!
[motoheadmall.com]
-----------------------------------
Rust Free Lancaster Ca



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/17/2014 08:12AM by davemotohead.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: davemotohead ()
Date: November 17, 2014 08:18AM

I did do a vid on this also!thumbs up







Email me at: Dave Motohead

1960 4dr sedan caveman car
1961 Rampside (Chetside)
1962 Rampside (Barnside)
1962 Short Rampside (Shortside)
1962 Monza 700 Wagon
1963 Monza 900 coup (General Nader)




Sign my guest book!
[motoheadmall.com]
-----------------------------------
Rust Free Lancaster Ca

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: '66Monza ()
Date: November 17, 2014 08:31AM

bmarsh52 wrote: Sears Hardware has the correct bushing for $4.99. Their part number is 58105

I have done multiple searches on Sears online and their Parts Direct site and I come up with a big ZERO. Can you provide a link for this?

Kurt
1966 Monza convertible
140 - 4 speed

Pittsburgh,Pa.
CORSA MEMBER
WPCC - Western Pennsylvania Corvair Club - 2018 National Convention



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/17/2014 08:32AM by '66Monza.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: vairchet ()
Date: November 17, 2014 10:15AM

Quick question: Every late model shifter tube assembly that I've taken apart had a plastic or paper-like sleeve inside.... does anyone reuse the 'anti-rattle' sleeve?

Chet in Ramona

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: November 17, 2014 11:06AM

I usually left it out Chet. Some I have put bushings on both ends, but you have to make sure the tube runs streight. Just one bushing in the front has worked fine.

Corventure Dave

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: bmarsh52 ()
Date: November 17, 2014 01:17PM

Kurt. I don't have a link I just walked into my local store and they were in bins in the fastener section. It is not the regular Sears store. It's the Sears appliance and hardware store. They have an entire isle of fasteners. The barcode/UPC number for the bushing is 0-08236-16763-4.

Options: ReplyQuote
Re: Shifter Bushing Installation
Posted by: strangecars ()
Date: November 17, 2014 02:47PM

I followed Dave Motohead's video and everything turned out great. I purchased the two bushings from the local true value hardware store.

Steve Morton
1967 Monza, 1961 Rampside, 2 1964 Monza's, 1963 GB Custom
Nampa, Idaho

"If you're not having fun, you're doing it wrong"

Options: ReplyQuote
Pages: 123Next
Current Page: 1 of 3


Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
This forum powered by Phorum.