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Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: April 17, 2012 11:25PM

Today at breakfast I was telling a friend what I had found was causing a wheel lockup on my 67/// and that it has the same brakes as Chevelle...

Guy in the next booth says he'll pay me $100 if I can figure out what's wrong with his Chevelle... fresh resto.. everything new.. lousy brakes..

So it couldn't be a groove in the backing plate like mine...

Went over to his garage and pulled a drum.... shoes on backwards!

A local and well respected shop had done the work..

Went online and showed him how to get info for problems like this...





MODERATOR
Somewhere between Sea Mountain and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
.............................PG...................................Turbo

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: DRCORVAIR ()
Date: April 17, 2012 11:29PM

Awesome, I love it when a kernel of knowledge is put to good use. Great story and let's hope more old knowledge can be passed on.
D

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: dodgeboy69 ()
Date: April 17, 2012 11:37PM

My friend had a 65 Mustang with brake problems. The work was done by a respected local mechanic. It would have great brakes for about a day and by the end of a week, the pedal would be on the floor. The "mechanic" could not fix it. I looked at it and the self adjusters were on backwards, which caused the brakes back off as it was driven. Properly installed the adjusters and all was well. I think the mechanic was ASE certified. Perhaps the last letter of ASE should be an "S" in this case.

Donnie Carns

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: davemotohead ()
Date: April 17, 2012 11:50PM

Ya it seems these days if its not plugged into a computor to tell the Mechanic whats wrong with it they are at a total loss!! Looking in a book is a thing of the past in most cases,,let alone doing any kind of research to make sure things are done correctly,,But,,Everyone that owns a old car should learn to do the work themselfs or have A qualifide old time Mechanic work on it,,ASE means nothing anymore.



Email me at: Dave Motohead
Visit My web site(Under Construction)
Sign my guest book!
[motoheadmall.com]
-----------------------------------
I AM THE GRIM REAPER FOR OLD CARS!
-----------------------------------
Rust Free Lancaster Ca

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: Swifster ()
Date: April 17, 2012 11:51PM

"You have a timing light?" Confused look... "A what?"

"Did you change the points and condenser?" "What are those?"

"These cars are sooooo complicated. I was told they were EASY to work on..."

The scary thing about the brakes is that many new cars still have drum brakes on them.

Tom Allen
Lakeland, FL
Just Another Day in Paradise



1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4BBL, 4-Speed, A/C

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: April 17, 2012 11:52PM

Naw... just no hands on experience.... what it takes...


Heck.. took me 3 times of looking... and an hour on the web to figure my problem out...


Needless to say, all four backing plates are now smooth on the rub pads.. and greased...





MODERATOR
Somewhere between Sea Mountain and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
.............................PG...................................Turbo

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: April 17, 2012 11:54PM

Swifster Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The scary thing about the brakes is that many new
> cars still have drum brakes on them.
======================================

But they are on the light rear.... last well over 100k nowadaZe!





MODERATOR
Somewhere between Sea Mountain and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
.............................PG...................................Turbo

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: jimc ()
Date: April 18, 2012 12:01AM

Matt,

Did you collect the $100 wager?

jimc

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: lgoodwin ()
Date: April 18, 2012 12:14AM

davemotohead Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Ya it seems these days if its not plugged into a
> computor to tell the Mechanic whats wrong with it
> they are at a total loss!!
IF you can even get them to do that! I had an 87 Buick that would intermittently just die. Always started right back up again. Took it to a dyno-tune shop and was told its probably just a flaky injector connector. They had no proof of it, did not read the trouble code.
Took it to an in-law who owns a carb/emissions shop. He just kept reefing on the ECM to ignition module harness like he was trying to tear it clean off, then insisted it a bad wiring harness. Dealer wanted $400 for a crummy 3-foot 8 wire harness, so decided to do my own investigation. Took less than 5 minutes to pop the top off the ignition module and see the very obvious cause. The potting medium had shrunk away from the connections and they had all corroded to death. New ignition module cured the problem for about $100.
The next problem with this car, acting like the ECM was running in default mode (dirty or bad mass-airflow sensor). I read the trouble codes by counting flashes of the check engine light, and as reported by the ECM, it was the MAF sensor. One $80 part fixed it.
Now, I don't even consider myself a very good shade tree mechanic. If I can find/fix these problems, why can't a REAL mechanic do it?

1962 Corvair 900 sedan1967 Corvair Monza 140/4-speed1968 Corvair 500 coupe1983 Mexican Mustang 5.0
1962 900 sedan needs a home1967 Monza 140/4-spd1968 500 coupe (now my son's)1983 Mexican Mustang 5.0

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: davemotohead ()
Date: April 18, 2012 12:24AM

Yep!! Stick a jumper wire in the comp conector and count the flashes on the Check Engine light!! Done it many times!! lol

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: jimc ()
Date: April 18, 2012 12:28AM

Have to second Dave's comment.

We bought a really nice looking 1986 S10 Blazer 2 door, with 235,000 miles for a twin boys first car. The kids started having some intermittent running issues a few days later. I really did not have the time to fool with it so took it to the local Chevy dealer.

At the end of the day they called to say the car was ready, the bill was $225.00, so I asked what they did. Tune up and two hours of diagnostic time. The problem was a cracked distributor cap and couple bad wires. So after I came down from the ceiling, I asked why 2 hours of diagnostic time, in addition to the tune up labor and parts. Didn't they know how to visually check mundane things first.

We finally negotiated it down to just the cost of a tune up.

jimc
1965 Corsa

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: socalspyder ()
Date: April 18, 2012 12:33AM

Good job matt !

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: Swifster ()
Date: April 18, 2012 12:49AM

With business vehicles, I usually just take them to the dealership. When my Ranger was just a young pup with 60K on it, I had them replace the serpentine belt. I also TOLD them I wanted a new tensioner. Past experience had told me that if I didn't do this, the belt would squeel. I was driving to California to pick up my Studebaker in two days.

That belt howled all the way to CA and back. I took the truck back in and was advised it needed a tensioner. They wanted me to give the $85 (1 hour) to replace the tensioner. After a very lengthy discussion, I just had to pay for the tensioner as a part.

Tom Allen
Lakeland, FL
Just Another Day in Paradise



1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4BBL, 4-Speed, A/C

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: jimmyo ()
Date: April 18, 2012 01:42AM

I had the same experience with a computer and my furnace. Experts couldn't find the problem, With a little research and a few parts I was able to fix them myself.

Jim O'Connor
45 miles north of The Bronx, N.Y.
1962 Greenbrier 110 4spd
1964 Monza Convertible 110 PG
"Wherever you go....There you are"


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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: bill darcy ()
Date: April 18, 2012 03:02AM

Met a guy at a car show who later became a good friend.Said he was having valve problems with a 351C in a Cougar.Fresh rebuild that several guys had tried to fix for him.They kept adjusting the valves only to have the clatter come back after a few miles.Went to his place tightened the rockers down and we went for a ten mile ride.He was amazed that none of the so called local mechanics knew that his engine had bottoming seat rockers.

In the Hub City, Belen NM

Lead from behind..... get left in the dust
"I have not failed I've just found ten thousand ways that won't work" Thomas Edison

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: Bob Helt ()
Date: April 18, 2012 03:24AM

One of the resons I wrote my Corvair carburetor books.

Regards,
Bob Helt

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: cnicol ()
Date: April 18, 2012 03:30AM

My topic at the 2011 Fan Belt Toss dinner speech was about the need to mentor youngsters in order to pass along this kind of knowledge. I just today had a phone conversation with a club member who was shocked to learn that a yearly or twice annual tune-up was required for a daily driver!

Craig N. Coeur d'Alene ID.
66 Black Monza 4dr, 4.2L V8 49k
66 Red Monza 2dr 140/4 EFI 60k
61 Seamist Jade Rampside 140 PG
65 Cypress Green Monza 140/4 4dr
65 White 4-dr 110/AC/PG (project)
64 GB -CrUnChEd (donor)
64 Monza coupe (parts)

20 Tons of parts in boxes

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: Leon Renaud ()
Date: April 18, 2012 03:40AM

My son and I were talking about this today.He loves Chevy won't drive anything else his dailys have been Chevy or GMC pick ups not long ago he picked up a 1 owner Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4 with a Vortech Engine, The truck had a slight miss at highway speeds, I "Did a tune up" as much as I knew plugs,cap, wires etc. The truck still had the miss but very mild just enough to notice it now. I went on the web and checked out some sites to find that this particular year is known for either bad distributors or crank triggers. Told him to get it scanned and he saoid he was done with it and parted the truck out he kept the motor as a "core" o rebuild for his 77 Vega drag car. Today he started to strip the motor only to find the distributor gear worn out in the oddest pattern I have ever seen one half of the gear as in half the OD the teeth were worn razor thin!like only 1 side of the gear was hardened!It got us talking about the fact BASICS still apply to the damn new stuff!Then we got to discussing "Basics" and I had to say I have forgotten a lot as things changed like polorizing generators or voltage regulators! This was a no brainer when I was growing up around cars but I'd be damned if I can remember the right way to do it now!.
Had a Valve adjustment issue with a chevy 350 that wouldn't hold the settings guy was ready to junk the rebuilt motor in his blazer till I just put a new set or rocker nuts on it no more problems after that .

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: Radio Joe ()
Date: April 18, 2012 05:36AM

I think Matt hit it when he said "Lack of hands-on experience"

I grew up in the 80s/90s- Where all the old mechanics refused to work on those new Computer cars, and the mechanics who did always blamed the "BRAIN BOX" for every problem. My Dad, grandfather and a friends dad taught me mechanics on old stuff and I learned the newer stuff by working on it- Camaros, Monte Carlos, Mustangs ect. Back then you could still get the "You can have it if you get it out of my yard" deals so you had nothing to lose tinkering with them.

I remember My dad drove a 92 chevy truck- it started running real bad... He said the computer was going bad eye rolling smiley I asked him if he read the codes from the check engine light. He said "yeah it said TEMP SENSOR" but that aint gonna cause it to run like that".... So after trying to explain to him for 10 minutes, I decided to just prove it to him... Had him start the truck, ran like crap, pulled the wire off the temp sensor and grounded it to a bolt on the intake... Truck immediately ran better. That was a fun day drinking smiley

Laurens, SC

Photobucket

www.joesclassiccarradio.com

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Re: Old Tech Knowledge is being forgotten..
Posted by: friedfish80 ()
Date: April 18, 2012 05:59AM

Much like radio joe I grew up in thr 80's and 90's as well. My dad (4 carbs) really only taught me how to change oil and disk brakes. And now here I am in my 30's with a 63 monza down to mostly a shell and a powertrain. And thanks to the help from the members here I feel that there's nothing on either my 63, 64 or 65 that I can't do. I can't tell you many times I have told my dad "I'm gonna rebuild th carbs" or "I'm gonna rebuild this". And the first thing he asks me. "Do you know how to do that?" Typicaly my answer is allways no. But how hard can it be.

I just have a hard time with tuneing. I have allways seem to have never gotten it right.

And ill fully admit. I don't know points, dwell, or a lot of old stuff. I have never had any automotive education. But amongsts my friends, and family I'm one hell of a guy with a wrench in my hand. I have done a lot of great work out of my garage. And will continue to build awsome cars, trucks, jeeps, and motrcycles at home. There's allways room to learn. And there's allways a place to put some modern tec in these old cars.

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