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Block Case Bolts
Posted by: wittsend ()
Date: April 13, 2022 11:10AM

Does it matter (or is there an advantage) to the side the bolts enter thorough the case?

Is there any necessity (or advantage) to using a sealant like RTV on the bolts/nuts/washers? I have Hylomar for the external showing case areas.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: Lane66m ()
Date: April 13, 2022 12:24PM

Shop manual shows the way the production engine shop in Towanda did it. I install mine per the shop manual. They must have had a reason for the installation direction shown in the photos.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: Autoxer62 ()
Date: April 13, 2022 12:37PM

Sure, the fixture was set up with the engine on one side and you drop the bolts in.

I don't think those bolts are exposed to oil, but I may be wrong.

Bryan Blackwell | Fairfax Station, Va. | bryan@skiblack.com | [autoxer.skiblack.com]
Corvairs: '62 700 Wagon, '64 Greenbrier, '66 Corsa
"Why do something if you're not going to obsess about it?"

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: vairmech ()
Date: April 13, 2022 03:19PM

The bolts generally do not need to be sealed and it does not matter which way the bolts go in the block.

Ken Hand
Handy Car Care
248 613 8586

Vairmech@aol.com

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: JimBrandberg ()
Date: April 14, 2022 04:55AM

Years ago I made a "table" for a crankcase to lay in sideways. I lay the left half in there with a bolt or two and then present the right half. So my bolts are on the left and my nuts are on the right. I stand it up and slide the table off to insert the rest of the bolts and do the torquing. I either stand it up on a couple of 1 x 2s or hang it off the bench to protect the cam gear. When I lay it back on its side #1 is up for checking things.

Jim Brandberg
Isanti, MN
CorvairRepair.com



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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: wittsend ()
Date: April 14, 2022 12:09PM

Thank you everyone for your replies. Hopefully the judge can declare, "Case Closed" this weekend.

One more question, does the washer go on the bolt, or the nut? Also, obviously one half needs to be held stationary to torque. What is the proper portion to actually be turning, the bolt or the nut (if it matters)?

Jim, I have a metal (wire rod) milk case that seems to have just the right spacing for the studs to pass through. None of the case bolts are restricted either so I can get a tool on the bolt or nut as needed when torqueing.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/14/2022 12:10PM by wittsend.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: toms73novass ()
Date: April 14, 2022 12:43PM

Washer under nut. It prevents the nut from scoring the block while tightening. The head of the bolt should remain stationary.

-Tom


63' Monza Spyder Convertable (in process) MY Build Thread
62' Wagon rebuild MY Build Thread
65' Monza MY Build Thread
73' NovaSS 454 Big block (Sold)
86' BMW 325es
67' UltraVan 211 "Violet"
NFCC, UMCC
Grand Island, NY

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: Lane66m ()
Date: April 14, 2022 01:44PM

What washer? Flanged nuts and flanged bolt heads from factory.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: wittsend ()
Date: April 14, 2022 02:46PM

In my case it would be these washers (below). They were on my case when I disassembled the engine (80 HP, 1961). The washers seem to fit quite well on the shoulder of the bolt..., or the threaded end where it would be in conjunction with the nut. Yes, the nuts seem to have a smooth rounded edge (like a built in washer) extending beyond the hex portion.

Logically when I look at the full width of the nut it seems the washers would go on the bolt so it has an equal spread on the block surface like the nut. So far I have:

Washer on bolt (logically) to equal surface contact area of nut (seems wise to then rotate the bolt instead of the nut)

Washer on nut to prevent scoring (also seems logical) - when rotating nut

No washer - there shouldn't be any, the design of the nut doesn't need one.

I read the manual (1961) and it made no mention. I could not discern a washer or it's placement if there was one in the manual illustrations.

I read Classic Corvair (7th edition) and it made no mention. There was no image that answered this question.

I looked at the exploded illustration on the Clarks catalog and it did not illustrate the washer (nor does Clark's sell a washer).

This is why I thought it wise to ask. But now I'm even more confused.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/14/2022 02:47PM by wittsend.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: RexJohnson ()
Date: April 14, 2022 03:13PM

Those are the earlier smaller case bolts and I'm pretty sure that the washer goes under the bolt head. The later thicker bolts didn't use the washers.

RJ tools
Salem,Oregon

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: REM654DPG ()
Date: April 14, 2022 06:02PM

The early case bolts also have a lower torque as mentioned in and old topic that Motohead addressed for us. Have a great Easter weekend all!

[corvaircenter.com]

Regan Metcalf
Portland, OR

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: wittsend ()
Date: April 14, 2022 09:25PM

Thanks for all the input and links. Unless there is a good argument against, I'm going to put the washer on the bolt side and rotate the bolt (steel on steel) holding the nut stationary.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: Lane66m ()
Date: April 15, 2022 03:31AM

I had not disassembled my EM case yet. It might have those bolts, washers and nuts.

All of the shank of that bolt should inside the case. Washer should on the nut.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: vairmech ()
Date: April 15, 2022 04:17AM

Lane66m Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I had not disassembled my EM case yet. It might have those bolts, washers and nuts.
>
> All of the shank of that bolt should inside the case. Washer should on the nut.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

No, No, No and NO!

The washers go under the head with those bolts! The nuts have a built in washer just like all other case bolts.

Ken Hand
Handy Car Care
248 613 8586

Vairmech@aol.com

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: Ratt643 ()
Date: April 15, 2022 04:51PM

Shop manual calls for lubricating the htreads with oil. I use anti-seive on the threads and the face of the nut. This prevents binding and gives a better torque.

1964 Monza Coupe
1965 Corsa 140
1967 Monza Coupe

Maryville, TN
U.S. 129 The"Tail Of The Dragon"

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: wittsend ()
Date: April 17, 2022 12:46PM

Just when I thought I got a definitive answer I spoke to someone who is known as a knowledgeable person here at the CC when I was at Cars & Coffee this weekend. I figured another opinion wouldn't hurt.

He stated that there are no washers on the bolts/nuts of the case. When I asked about early bolts specifically he said, "Never." Sill I'm going to go on my intuition and back it up with the Dave Motohead post that Reagan Metcalf linked above. It shows an early bolt (un-flanged) with a washer/flanged nut and a later, thicker flanged bolt with with a flanged nut and no washer. I have an enlarged image of the nut/washer to illustrate that the washer is separate from the flanged nut. I'm putting the washer on the bolt head and torqueing to 43-48 ft. lb's.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: Lane66m ()
Date: April 17, 2022 02:14PM

Go to parts catalog group 0.000, page 0-3P, item 0.030 It shows wSher used on 60-62 engines only under the bolt head. If you have a 63 or later engine, you should have the flanged head bolts and flanged nuts. I think I would use the later setup just to eliminate the washers, if I am not going for points gathering.

Manual is the final word on correct configuration.

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: corventure Dave ()
Date: April 18, 2022 08:14PM

So interesting...
I have disassembled many engines of all years over the years. I never came across the washers on any of them. If I had, they would be in my spare crankcase bolt collection.
However 1960's my have squeaked by me, as I didn't dismantle many of those year.
Another possibility may be that one of the bolt suppliers they used may have offered them.
I see different branded bolts used throughout the years.
As for the parts catalog, I have seen differences there also. Depends on the year of printing. Later prints have errors.

I learn something every day!

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: vairmech ()
Date: April 21, 2022 04:13AM

wittsend Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Thanks for all the input and links. Unless there is a good argument against, I'm going to put the washer on the bolt side and rotate the bolt (steel on steel) holding the nut stationary.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

I didn't catch this earlier, but NO.

Always hold the bolt and torque the nut.

Ken Hand
Handy Car Care
248 613 8586

Vairmech@aol.com

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Re: Block Case Bolts
Posted by: vairmech ()
Date: April 21, 2022 04:28AM

wittsend Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Just when I thought I got a definitive answer I spoke to someone who is known as a knowledgeable person here at the CC when I was at Cars & Coffee this weekend. I figured another opinion wouldn't hurt.
>
> He stated that there are no washers on the bolts/nuts of the case. When I asked about early bolts specifically he said, "Never." Sill I'm going to go on my intuition and back it up with the Dave Motohead post that Reagan Metcalf linked above. It shows an early bolt (un-flanged) with a washer/flanged nut and a later, thicker flanged bolt with with a flanged nut and no washer. I have an enlarged image of the nut/washer to illustrate that the washer is separate from the flanged nut. I'm putting the washer on the bolt head and torqueing to 43-48 ft. lb's.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

In your picture the top bolt is for an early 60-61, maybe some 62 cases. Yes, the washer goes under the HEAD of the bolt as you can clearly see the nut is already flanged. Also check to see if the washer has a chamfer on the hole, if so that goes against the head of the bolt.

The second bolt in the picture is the more common but the important part is to look at the head of the bolt, it has a built in flange! No washer needed. The nut is also flanged just like the top bolt.

The bottom stud has a flanged nut on both ends. That is a special stud that takes a special process using a reamer to install and is generally used for racing engines.

Ken Hand
Handy Car Care
248 613 8586

Vairmech@aol.com

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