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Vent window rubber
Posted by: Ron in Indy ()
Date: October 17, 2020 12:16PM

The seal that goes between the door and the window (below) need to be replaced on my '63 convertible. I was reading about what a pain it is to remove the windows and get them properly adjusted so I was wondering if anyone ever tried to install the rubber with the window in place. It looks like the only obstacle is the bottom pivot point, so the first ~3" of rubber would need to be sliced but I think that could be repaired with adhesive and still be functional and invisible. Alternatively, the rubber could be installed in two pieces (cut at the pivot) and again repaired, but the repair in this case would be more obvious. I hate to "half-@ss" this, but I really don't want to remove the windows unless absolutely necessary. Thoughts?
Ron in FL

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: ace63 ()
Date: October 17, 2020 01:14PM

I recently purchased a 63 convertible.
Car was in pretty good shape but still needed some work.
I noticed that my vent windows were almost impossible to shut correctly.
The rubber looks to be in good shape. I believe the previous owner didn't do a great job replacing. I plan to consult a local Corvair expert and see what can be done. I have looked a at the shop manual and it seems to me the only way to do it right is to pull the inside cover and try to readjust the vent.
Will be interested in the reply's you get.

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: Ron in Indy ()
Date: October 17, 2020 02:09PM

My vent windows open and close perfectly, but the rubber is hard and brittle. It seems like replacing without removing the windows should work, but I hate to destroy $160 worth of rubber if it fails. tongue sticking out smiley

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: TerribleTed ()
Date: October 17, 2020 02:14PM

assembly needs to come out of the door in order to nicely install the new weatherstrips. You can not put the window shaft down thru the new weatherstrip without removing the glass from the framework, which can not be done with the unit in the car. Some rivets need to be removed and replaced as well. The last set I did on an early model (using Clark's parts), once I got the weatherstrips in the vents could not close. It seems the vertical piece is maybe a little fat I fix it by spacing the window track back a little from the triangle steel frame using some small washers as shims between the bottom of the triangle and the track while riveting and at the top of the triangle and the track under the screw there

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Avid Corvair hobbiest since 1984.
I have personally performed ground up restoration on over 20 Corvairs.
I currently work full time at restoring and repairing Corvairs.
Located in the Atlanta Georgia area.
[www.facebook.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/17/2020 02:15PM by TerribleTed.

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: Ron in Indy ()
Date: October 17, 2020 03:16PM

TerribleTed Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> assembly needs to come out of the door in order to nicely install the new weatherstrips. You can not put the window shaft down thru the new weatherstrip without removing the glass from the framework, which can not be done with the unit in the car. Some rivets need to be removed and replaced as well. The last set I did on an early model (using Clark's parts), once I got the weatherstrips in the vents could not close. It seems the vertical piece is maybe a little fat I fix it by spacing the window track back a little from the triangle steel frame using some small washers as shims between the bottom of the triangle and the track while riveting and at the top of the triangle and the track under the screw there

Thanks, it sounds like I misunderstood how the rubber is held in place. I was only planning on replacing the "L" shaped rubber since the vertical edge pieces are OK. I know those are riveted in place, but the other rubber looked like it was held in place by friction. I was thinking that I could cut a seam up to the bottom pivot, then thread the rubber in around it. Of course, the best way is to do it as you described, but I am not keen on removing the window assembly.

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: TerribleTed ()
Date: October 17, 2020 06:41PM

Ron in Indy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> TerribleTed Wrote:
> -------------------------------------------------------
> > assembly needs to come out of the door in order to nicely install the new weatherstrips. You can not put the window shaft down thru the new weatherstrip without removing the glass from the framework, which can not be done with the unit in the car. Some rivets need to be removed and replaced as well. The last set I did on an early model (using Clark's parts), once I got the weatherstrips in the vents could not close. It seems the vertical piece is maybe a little fat I fix it by spacing the window track back a little from the triangle steel frame using some small washers as shims between the bottom of the triangle and the track while riveting and at the top of the triangle and the track under the screw there
>
> Thanks, it sounds like I misunderstood how the rubber is held in place. I was only planning on replacing the "L" shaped rubber since the vertical edge pieces are OK. I know those are riveted in place, but the other rubber looked like it was held in place by friction. I was thinking that I could cut a seam up to the bottom pivot, then thread the rubber in around it. Of course, the best way is to do it as you described, but I am not keen on removing the window assembly.

You can cut a slit in it and stuff it in there I bet. The original has some steel pieces that might be difficult to pull out. Only issue with slitting the new piece is that it may or may not stay in place when operating the window and might be more prone to leak at the seam. I have only
ever do this the correct way. The rubber does not just slip in it is a bit oversize and squeezes into the track. Some white lithium grease and a blunted flat blade screwdriver, putty knife etc. is helpful in getting it to go all the way down into the track. (make sure not to leave any old strip in there or it will not go in well.)

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Avid Corvair hobbiest since 1984.
I have personally performed ground up restoration on over 20 Corvairs.
I currently work full time at restoring and repairing Corvairs.
Located in the Atlanta Georgia area.
[www.facebook.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/17/2020 06:44PM by TerribleTed.

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: Ron in Indy ()
Date: October 18, 2020 05:56AM

I think I should be able to rejoin the seams with some rubber bonding adhesive or cyanoacrylate glue. I had some success with dishwashing detergent to help slide rubber weatherstripping into a channel. I also have a set of plastic trim tools that should help in getting it seated properly. You are right about getting out the old stuff. It is so brittle, I'm sure it will come out in tiny pieces. angry smiley I'll give it a try and let you know how it works. I just wish this stuff wasn't so bloody expensive. I replaced a lot of the rubber on this car already, and I am always struck by how pricey some of these little pieces of rubber can be.
Cheers,
Ron in FL

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: 66vairman ()
Date: October 18, 2020 12:52PM

Ron said "I had some success with dishwashing detergent to help slide rubber weatherstripping into a channel."

My experience with dish washing detergent on metal is it is corrosive! It attracts moisture and can cause rust.

I've found ol WD-40 used modestly works and it evaporates so the seal holds better after you get in installed. Do test the rubber. Some of the cheap rubber bits will dissolve with a solvent like WD-40.

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: Ron in Indy ()
Date: October 18, 2020 04:47PM

Thanks for the tip. I'll try the WD-40 first. The detergent does get a little sticky when it starts to dry.
Cheers,
Ron in FL

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: SpyderMan ()
Date: October 18, 2020 06:33PM

I had to do quite a bit of trimming on mine to get a good fit witch was much easier to do with them out.

Sam Russell
Durham NC
1962 Monza Wagon Ted Brown EFI Gen II
1964 Spyder coupe


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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: junkman ()
Date: October 18, 2020 07:10PM

If you don't drive your car in the rain, then don't do the rubbers. It is not an easy job, and a lot depends on your skills and attention to detail. I just watched a video on how to repair a clock, so I guess that makes me a clock repair man! I have had many windows out, and it is a difficult task to get them back in correctly, and to operate correctly. If it were my car, I wouldn't do the job until I absolutely had to.

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: Ron in Indy ()
Date: October 19, 2020 07:00AM

For me, the main reason for replacing these is cosmetic (see pics below) I know that trying to do it by removing the windows would be totally frustrating, so I wanted to try it with the glass in place. Anyway, I ordered the rubber yesterday so I'll give it a shot and let you know how I make out.

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Re: Vent window rubber
Posted by: FoiledAgain ()
Date: October 19, 2020 12:33PM

I have had very good luck dealing with hard rubber seals, hoses, windshield seals and so forth with a cheap oscillating cutting tool.

It's the same basic tool a doc uses to cut through a plaster cast.

They work so, so much nicer and far faster than spending all afternoon trying to slice through bone-hard old rubber with a utility knife.

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