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Re: Filling empty carbs thru duckbill
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: May 19, 2020 02:02PM

Nope! that's an airvent! Pour gas in the long slotted thing above the choke plate...the "Duckbill"



MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: joelsplace ()
Date: May 19, 2020 02:31PM

Matt got it!

Joel
Northlake, TX
5 Ultravans, 114 Corvairs and counting...

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Frog ()
Date: May 19, 2020 04:57PM

Man, I'm glad you clarified that . . .

Thank you.

Frog

Rob Lane
Clayton, in the Northeast Georgia Mountains.
1964 500 Coupe
Purchased by me in April of 1964.

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Seth Emerson ()
Date: May 20, 2020 03:03PM

What year did they abandon the single vent and go to the pair of holes in the top cover? Matt's advice doesn't work on a late model. No hole there.

Seth Emerson

Check my new Performance Corvair Web site [www.perfvair.com]

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: joelsplace ()
Date: May 20, 2020 06:36PM

Right. You have to fill through the small holes in the throat.
I don't know what year that changed.

Joel
Northlake, TX
5 Ultravans, 114 Corvairs and counting...

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: RexJohnson ()
Date: May 21, 2020 12:45PM

Somewhere around '63. Some of the years had all 3 vents.

RJ tools
Salem,Oregon

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: American Mel ()
Date: May 21, 2020 01:09PM

RexJohnson Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Somewhere around '63. Some of the years had all 3 vents.


I have seen a couple of those.
Very Interesting.
I thought that someone had decided that one way was better than the other, and added to what was there.

-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-
WA. state, 1 mile south of the Canadian border,
I am not at the end of the world, but you can see it from here.
Have; '66 Monza Coupe - 140, 4-spd. Daily driver beater
'67 Monza Vert. - 140, 4-spd. Daily driver beater
'67 A/C Moredoor Monza
Have had; '61 Monza coupe, '62 Monza Wagon, '63 Spyder, '65 Corsa
.
non-vair
'04 Dodge Cummins Quad Dualy, approaching 400K
17'Terry

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Frog ()
Date: May 28, 2020 09:31AM

I’m fixin’ to test the spark to the number one spark plug.

Because my engine’s on the bench, I’m guessing that the equivalent of “turn on the ignition” (as the sticky instruction states) is my connecting one end of the wire (that has the ballast resistor) to the + side of the coil and connecting the other end to the + terminal on the battery.

My battery’s at 11.95 volts, but I believe (hope) that’s enough juice to the coil—even considering the ballast resistor—to send those 20,000 volts to the spark plug for this test. Any advice on this, please.

Afterwards, I’ll charge the battery in preparation for the highly anticipated start-up and twenty-minute run. Some folks recommend using the battery charger at low amperage for the initial start-up, but that confuses me even more.

Thank you.
Frog

P.S. Last month marks fifty-six years I've owned this car.

Rob Lane
Clayton, in the Northeast Georgia Mountains.
1964 500 Coupe
Purchased by me in April of 1964.

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: May 28, 2020 11:02AM

Charge the battery for 24 hrs at 10 amps or less. 12.5 is what you want.

Battery Heavy NEGATIVE cable to one of the bolts that hold the starter.

Batt. + to Ballast Resistor and wire between resistor and Coil's +

Black wire from Dist. to Coils' -

Now with Coil's Hi Tension lead held 1/4" from engine metal. rotate the distributor quickly it's full travel. You should see a spark each time you move it.

MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: RexJohnson ()
Date: May 28, 2020 12:04PM

12.6 volts is a fully charged battery or 2.1 volts per cell.

RJ tools
Salem,Oregon

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: joelsplace ()
Date: May 28, 2020 11:23PM

12.6 may be technically true but in reality after it has just come off the charger or while it is on the charger it will be much higher. Depending on the charger it will be around 15.5V on charge.
You'll want to be careful when using a 10A charger. You could easily fry the battery especially if the air temperature is hot.
Matt has a good point though. It takes a lot more time to charge a battery than most people think.

Joel
Northlake, TX
5 Ultravans, 114 Corvairs and counting...

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Frog ()
Date: May 30, 2020 10:34AM

Charged the battery to 12.3 volts.

I followed MattNall's instructions after that.

When I touched the plus side of the battery with the clamp to the resistance-wired connector, I heard a muffled click from the vicinity of the distributor and new coil. The ballast resistor is also in that area.

Ignoring that, I held the high-tension lead from the coil a quarter inch from the engine, rotated the distributor CCW; no spark.

All the continuity tests checked out fine.

The only thing I know about ballast resistors is that their function is to reduce voltage to the coil. Now, when I checked the voltage between the battery side of the resistor I got a reading of 12.2 volts. When I move the lead over to the coil side of the resistor, I still got a reading of 12.2 volts. The ballast-resistor is a Duralast DR794 with 1.8 resistance.

Seems to me though, that even if there were NO ballast resistor between the battery and the coil, I still should've got a spark.

What is going on?

Thank you.

Frog

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Seth Emerson ()
Date: May 30, 2020 11:00AM

Actually, the function of the ballast resistor is to reduce the current flowing across the points while the engine is running (adding to their longevity). The original supplied voltage (~12V) reaches the points by flowing through the ballast and the coil primary windings. The higher the total resistance, the less current flows (with the same supplied voltage.) The less current, the longer the points last. (generally) If the current drops too far, you won't build an adequate field in the primary of the coil - so you won't get an adequate induced output in the secondary of the coil - and the ignition won't fire the plug.

Seth Emerson

Check my new Performance Corvair Web site [www.perfvair.com]

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Frog ()
Date: May 30, 2020 12:12PM

Now, I'm really confused.

I thought the ballast resistor functioned to reduce voltage to the coil to prevent it from overheating; maybe the side benefit for that lower voltage meandering its way around the primary windings of the coil is that the voltage is lower flowing through the closed points to ground. I don't know why the amount of voltage flowing through the closed points would make any difference in their longevity.

On the other hand, from what I've read, the condenser is the device that reduces points wear because it absorbs the EMF when the field collapses that causes the 20,000 volts to the spark plugs.

But, here's my concern. Whether or not there is a ballast resistor installed, 8 to 12 volts or so should have produced the spark in my procedure . . . right?

Thank you.

Frog

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Seth Emerson ()
Date: May 30, 2020 07:19PM

With 12 volts hooked to the coil positive lead - and nothing else hooked to it - grounding the negative lead, then removing it, should cause a spark from the thick center lead of the coil to ground.

Seth Emerson

Check my new Performance Corvair Web site [www.perfvair.com]

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: jjohnsonjo ()
Date: May 30, 2020 07:57PM

Frog Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

>
> On the other hand, from what I've read, the condenser is the device that reduces points wear because it absorbs the EMF when the field collapses that causes the 20,000 volts to the spark plugs.
>
>
The condenser also forms a an electronic tank circuit. It makes the the spark last much longer, or fatter. You can only see this with an oscilloscope. its a trapezoid wave form. They attempt to replicate the with multi-strike CDI.

J.O.

65 Corsa Turbo Vert
79 Honda XL 500S
69 Honda CL 160 D
2010 BMW F 650 GS
2003 Bounder 36D
2013 KIA Optima SX turbo-AKA ZIPPY (wife,s car)
69 Newport Holiday Sailboat
Baja 150 dune buggy cart
Coleman HS 500 UTV
2016 KIA Sorento SXL Turbo

Bethlehem,Pa


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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Frog ()
Date: June 01, 2020 08:49AM

Apparently, my ballast resistor (B/R) failed on its first set-up. Is it common for a B/R to fail on first use, or did I buy an inferior product? (Duralast DR794 with 1.8 resistance.)

In one of my comments above I statement that I heard a "muffled click" from the vicinity of my B/R when I attached my wire to the + battery terminal.

Since then, I've performed every known procedure to test the resistance for the ballast resistor--no resistance at all. Reads 12.3 volts going in and coming out.

Any suggestions?

However, I did perform the spark test on the coil. Just for clarity, it's a new one with 1.4 Ohms (with multimeter's resistance subtracted) and 15,800 Ohms. I wasn't sure if I had the coil's high tension wire close enough to the ground. That didn't matter, though, because I was unknowingly touching the contact and when I broke the circuit, I didn't need to SEE, I FELT. Ouch.

Thank you.

Frog

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: June 01, 2020 09:05AM

You have Spark!! Everything is FINE.. don't change any wiring!!

MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: cnicol ()
Date: June 01, 2020 09:05AM

A little note about ballast resistors, or any resistor for that matter.

Resistors only drop voltage when there's a load, such as the ignition coil, or a bulb, or whatever. When the points are open, there's no load on the resistor so it will show full battery voltage on either side.

Voltage drop = resistance value x current flowing through.

Voltage drop is zero when current is zero.

If you want to check your "ballast" resistor, connect the circuit to a 12v (ish) power source, and briefly ground coil (-) while measuring voltage at coil (+).

You should measure 6 to 10 volts if the ballast resistor is good and properly sized vs the coil.

Craig N. Coeur d'Alene ID.
66 Black Monza 4dr, 4.2L V8 49k
61 Seamist Jade Rampside 140 PG
60 Monza coupe (sold, sniff sniff)
66 Sprint Corsa convt - First car! Re-purchased 43 years later
2+2 gnatsuM 5691

+17 Tons of parts

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Re: Static Timing the Distributor, Uh-oh
Posted by: Frog ()
Date: June 02, 2020 05:17PM

If it isn't one thing, it's another.

In my comments above I said that in the procedure to test the spark from the coil's high tension line, I felt the shock.

Now, following this procedure to check the distributor . . .

Batt. + to Ballast Resistor and wire between resistor and Coil's +
Black wire from Dist. to Coils' -
Now with Coil's Hi Tension lead held 1/4" from engine metal. rotate the distributor quickly it's full travel. You should see a spark each time you move it . . .

I didn't get a spark, so I touched the tip of the of the lead with my finger while spinning the distributor--no shock.

The distributor and condenser are new.

What am I doing wrong?

Thank you.

Frog

Rob Lane
Clayton, in the Northeast Georgia Mountains.
1964 500 Coupe
Purchased by me in April of 1964.

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