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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: blackspyder ()
Date: December 04, 2018 06:59PM

I had put an epoxy coating many years ago on my garage floor, and I didnt know my floor did not have a vapor barrier, so after a number of years,it starting lifting. My garage floor needs to be redone, when my car is done, I am getting a new floor with vapor barrier and radiant heat in it and not coating it. As far as coatings, the only thing that I have seen that works, but the floor needs to be in good shape, is the hot flow flooring. I know a couple of fire companies around me that had that applies to their floors. Even with the big truck tires on there and all the abuse those floors take, there is no lifting or peeling, but this is something that is professionally done.

Roger Fedor
Whitehall, PA
1963 Spyder Coupe, currently undergoing re-restoration

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: December 04, 2018 07:01PM

I'm waiting for a local "polishing" contractor to set up an appointment... I'll report when I get a price for a 30x30 / 900 sq. ft. clear floor..





MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: Frank DuVal ()
Date: December 04, 2018 07:04PM

Caraholic, the proper method is to put the gravel base down (or sand) then the vapor barrier, then the rebar and chairs or welded wire (WW) mesh, then the PEX if used, then pour the concrete.

It is never a good idea to leave out the vapor barrier, especially here on the east coast. You can use 2" rigid foam as the vapor barrier if you want to insulate. It goes above the gravel and inside the stem wall or turned down footer. Lots of pictures on the internet.

Only use a broom finish outside, as it is hard to sweep clean and slide things over it, like creepers, jacks and stools. This way all the bays will have the same finish, so you can swap purposes later.winking smiley

If you have the height for a lift, do 6" where it might go, if not, 4" is fine.

Frank DuVal

Fredericksburg, VA

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: srt ()
Date: December 04, 2018 09:45PM

The garage is 20' x 20' and will only be used for parking cars & for some storage. No cutting, welding, grinding, dropping motors or transmissions, floor jacks, etc.

As for the vapor barrier prior to the pour, that I can't tell you. The house is a new build in a tract in the low desert in California. The lot hasn't even been graded yet and it's a eventually going to be a 1000 home development when built out in about 3 years. I would be surprised if the developer will go to the trouble or expense.

Will the builder put one down? Possibly. That's one thing that I will have to dig into.

I do like the polishing idea but haven't yet explored costs for any of the differing alternatives that there are.

I would like to do this to cut down on the clean-up from probable oil leaks from the cars that will be parked in the garage and the epoxy coating came to mind first.

I don't like the thought of the finish trapping moisture that's for sure and I think that polishing while leaving a smooth surface will still (I think) be able to breathe.

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: TerribleTed ()
Date: December 04, 2018 10:21PM

Frank DuVal Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> My garage floors at home are for working, not for
> show. With all the hammering, cutting, grinding,
> welding, gouging, plasma arc'ing, solvent
> splashing, epoxy dripping, spray painting, etc., I
> would just freak out if it was a nice, new
> expensive coated floor coating I was tearing up.
> Plain old concrete works for me.
>
>
> I was wondering the same question. Just how well
> does epoxy hold up to welding slag and sparks,
> cutting torch and plasma cutter sparks/slag,
> grinder sparks and dust, spilling acetone/lacquer
> thinner/paints/other solvents/ DOT 3 brake fluid
> (well, for newer ABS cars...), battery acid and
> all those other things that hit the garage floor
> in my use.eye popping smiley
>
> Of course the simple concrete sealer went away
> with the first solvent that spilled....

I have not found any liquid that will bother my epoxy floor coating. It will welding burn fairly easily. Heavy grinding with direct floor contact of sparks can leave marks. I have also chipped it in quite a few places while using the floor to support things while beating them with a hammer, or from dropping heavy items on it. Very durable stuff overall. The damage on it is from my abusesmiling smiley The epoxy I used was a true 2 part non- water based product. It cleans way better than a sealed concrete floor.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Avid Corvair hobbiest since 1984.
I have personally performed ground up restoration on over 20 Corvairs.
I currently work full time at restoring and repairing Corvairs.
Located in the Atlanta Georgia area.
[www.facebook.com]

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: dolomitefan ()
Date: December 05, 2018 04:28AM

My current house used to be a show home and the garage was the sales office. Consequently I have carpet tiles in my garage now. I accept though that owning a Corvair and an old British car that oil leaks on the carpet are inevitable but on the plus side it's warm and looks quite nice.

---------------------------------------------------------------
Mark Gibson, Staffordshire, England

1961 Corvair Greenbrier
1980 Triumph Dolomite Sprint
2009 Mazda MX5
2018 Infiniti Q30

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: MattNall ()
Date: December 05, 2018 07:16AM

I used carpet for decades.. Living in San Diego lots of free large pieces...

That way garage got cleaned out every 6 mths!





MODERATOR
Sea Mountain, between Charleston Harbor and Coos Bay! SW Oregon Coast
Click HERE for My Website...Click HERE for My TechPages!
..............................110-PG.................................................Webered-Turbo

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: srt ()
Date: December 05, 2018 07:42AM

TerribleTed Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Frank DuVal Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > My garage floors at home are for working, not
> for
> > show. With all the hammering, cutting,
> grinding,
> > welding, gouging, plasma arc'ing, solvent
> > splashing, epoxy dripping, spray painting, etc.,
> I
> > would just freak out if it was a nice, new
> > expensive coated floor coating I was tearing
> up.
> > Plain old concrete works for me.
> >
> >
> > I was wondering the same question. Just how
> well
> > does epoxy hold up to welding slag and sparks,
> > cutting torch and plasma cutter sparks/slag,
> > grinder sparks and dust, spilling
> acetone/lacquer
> > thinner/paints/other solvents/ DOT 3 brake
> fluid
> > (well, for newer ABS cars...), battery acid and
> > all those other things that hit the garage
> floor
> > in my use.eye popping smiley
> >
> > Of course the simple concrete sealer went away
> > with the first solvent that spilled....
>
> I have not found any liquid that will bother my
> epoxy floor coating. It will welding burn fairly
> easily. Heavy grinding with direct floor contact
> of sparks can leave marks. I have also chipped it
> in quite a few places while using the floor to
> support things while beating them with a hammer,
> or from dropping heavy items on it. Very durable
> stuff overall. The damage on it is from my abusesmiling smiley
> The epoxy I used was a true 2 part non- water
> based product. It cleans way better than a sealed
> concrete floor.

Do you recall the brand name of the product(s) that you used?

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: srt ()
Date: December 05, 2018 07:43AM

MattNall Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I'm waiting for a local "polishing" contractor to
> set up an appointment... I'll report when I get
> a price for a 30x30 / 900 sq. ft. clear floor..


I would like to know when you find out.

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: TerribleTed ()
Date: December 05, 2018 08:35AM

srt Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> TerribleTed Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Frank DuVal Wrote:
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> > -----
> > > My garage floors at home are for working, not
> > for
> > > show. With all the hammering, cutting,
> > grinding,
> > > welding, gouging, plasma arc'ing, solvent
> > > splashing, epoxy dripping, spray painting,
> etc.,
> > I
> > > would just freak out if it was a nice, new
> > > expensive coated floor coating I was tearing
> > up.
> > > Plain old concrete works for me.
> > >
> > >
> > > I was wondering the same question. Just how
> > well
> > > does epoxy hold up to welding slag and
> sparks,
> > > cutting torch and plasma cutter sparks/slag,
> > > grinder sparks and dust, spilling
> > acetone/lacquer
> > > thinner/paints/other solvents/ DOT 3 brake
> > fluid
> > > (well, for newer ABS cars...), battery acid
> and
> > > all those other things that hit the garage
> > floor
> > > in my use.eye popping smiley
> > >
> > > Of course the simple concrete sealer went
> away
> > > with the first solvent that spilled....
> >
> > I have not found any liquid that will bother my
> > epoxy floor coating. It will welding burn
> fairly
> > easily. Heavy grinding with direct floor
> contact
> > of sparks can leave marks. I have also chipped
> it
> > in quite a few places while using the floor to
> > support things while beating them with a
> hammer,
> > or from dropping heavy items on it. Very
> durable
> > stuff overall. The damage on it is from my
> abusesmiling smiley
> > The epoxy I used was a true 2 part non- water
> > based product. It cleans way better than a
> sealed
> > concrete floor.
>
> Do you recall the brand name of the product(s)
> that you used?

Sorry it was 7-8 years ago. I do not recall the name. I did not purchase it locally but thru the internet based on some research and ratings I found. It was and is hard to discern what ratings are real and what ratings are just ads for a favored product however.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Avid Corvair hobbiest since 1984.
I have personally performed ground up restoration on over 20 Corvairs.
I currently work full time at restoring and repairing Corvairs.
Located in the Atlanta Georgia area.
[www.facebook.com]

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: john.jackson ()
Date: December 05, 2018 08:40AM

MattNall Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I used carpet for decades.. Living in San Diego
> lots of free large pieces...
>
> That way garage got cleaned out every 6 mths!


Carpet! Exactly what I am using in 2 of the 3 garage bays in this house.

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: solo2r ()
Date: December 05, 2018 09:16AM

My Customer and I went to the Barrett Jackson Auction in Scottsdale last year and saw that the had literally miles of this flooring! We talked with the Rep and made a deal as they need to sell it after event! undestructable, they breath, look great, easy to move around on with creepers and car dollies. The only thing I do not like is static electricity when walking across and touching metal/ground!

Attachments:
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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: 4carbcorvair ()
Date: December 05, 2018 09:27AM

First off, not a fan.

Next, depends on your plans. If you are going to park on it and minor maintnance to vehicles. I'm still not a fan.

If you plan on welding, torches, plasma, grinding, you are going to ruin it.

Personally, I'd leave it alone unless it's a show garage.

--------------------------------
Ronnie
Southern Maine.
www.dirigocorvairs.net
66 Corsa Convertible, 140, 4sp.
65 Monza Convertible, 110, PG.




It doesn't leak, it's marking it's territory.

A mirror is a reflection of the miles travelled.

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: solo2r ()
Date: December 05, 2018 09:44AM

I just posted as another option! This was a transmission shop for over 40 years when my Customer purchased building. Took a year to clean it out! Looked into pouring an epoxy but the transmission fluid retained in the the thick concrete prevented it.




"If you plan on welding, torches, plasma, grinding, you are going to ruin it."

I have done all of that and more on this stuff! The metal, oil and whatever falls through to the concrete. pull up the squares to clean up . Very difficult to get these to melt/burn!

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: Frank DuVal ()
Date: December 05, 2018 10:37AM

Quote
srt
Will the builder put one down? Possibly. That's one thing that I will have to dig into.

It is YOUR house, get it built the way you want it. The builder isn't paying the mortgage or taxes, are they?confused smiley

Another reason to avoid cookie-cutter tract homes, no say in what is in YOUR home. May as well buy a used home, at least you know how well it held up in the years prior to your ownership.winking smiley

Frank DuVal

Fredericksburg, VA

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: TerribleTed ()
Date: December 05, 2018 12:52PM

I would certainly ruin any coating or covering I put down. I do a lot of heavy work in my garage all the time.The floor epoxy I used has certainly saved me some concrete damage and is much easier to clean up for oil spills etc. as liquids do not soak into floor at all. The floor could fairly easily be cleaned sanded and recoated with minor filling for a few gouges to look new again.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Avid Corvair hobbiest since 1984.
I have personally performed ground up restoration on over 20 Corvairs.
I currently work full time at restoring and repairing Corvairs.
Located in the Atlanta Georgia area.
[www.facebook.com]

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: Caraholic4life ()
Date: December 05, 2018 02:37PM

srt Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The garage is 20' x 20' and will only be used for
> parking cars & for some storage. No cutting,
> welding, grinding, dropping motors or
> transmissions, floor jacks, etc.
>
> As for the vapor barrier prior to the pour, that I
> can't tell you. The house is a new build in a
> tract in the low desert in California. The lot
> hasn't even been graded yet and it's a eventually
> going to be a 1000 home development when built out
> in about 3 years. I would be surprised if the
> developer will go to the trouble or expense.
>
> Will the builder put one down? Possibly. That's
> one thing that I will have to dig into.
>

My first real estate purchase was a brand new condominium back in the mid eighties.
I wanted to add ceiling fixtures in both bedrooms as well as the dining area, add phone jacks and additional electric outlets in the bedrooms.
While negotiating the deal for the unit, I asked if these items could be added during the construction process.
The answer I got was Yes and No. The developer said I was not permitted to install the additional components myself because it would void any warranty from the contractors. They wouldn't offer it as an option or upgrade to be included in the financed price of the unit either BUT,,,,They did say it would be acceptable to pay the contractor to add the items if they were willing to do it, separate from the real estate transaction. This way if I didn't follow through with settlement, the additional work would be paid for and not change the sales price of the unit, or void any warranty.
For a whopping $150.00 I got three ceiling fixtures installed, two phone jacks, and two electric outlets. To me this was a no brainer and I went ahead and had the additional work done through the contractors.
As the unit was under construction and other folks walked through, some noticed it and also asked for the upgrade. Enough so that they started locking my unit at the end of the work day once they were able to secure it.
As it turns out, the next developments this builder built, these items became options. I guess they realized there was money to be made.

After all that, what I am saying is that it wouldn't hurt to ask the developer if they would have any objection to the contractor adding the vapor barrier if you paid the contractor directly, if it isn't a part of the job to begin with.
The same could be said for adding electrical outlets in the walls or ceiling for door openers if you see a need for them.


IF both, the developer and contractor are agreeable to the additional work if the contractor is paid directly and up front, you could probably save quite a bit of expense by going that route as compared to going back after settlement.

It wouldn't hurt to ask. JMO

1962 95 F.C. Van
1965 Monza Coupe
Westminster, Maryland

MID ENG enthusiast &
prior Kelmark owner.

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: gnrand ()
Date: December 05, 2018 03:10PM

Check out this company. Life time warranty. I remember a number of car shows promoting this product.

[ucoatit.com]

Wildomar,Ca

1965 Corsa Hard Top
!965 Corsa Convertible
1968 Monza 140 Convertible 4 speed
1966 435 HP Crown
1986 Buick GN

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: srt ()
Date: December 05, 2018 07:12PM

thumbs upCaraholic4life Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> srt Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > The garage is 20' x 20' and will only be used
> for
> > parking cars & for some storage. No cutting,
> > welding, grinding, dropping motors or
> > transmissions, floor jacks, etc.
> >
> > As for the vapor barrier prior to the pour, that
> I
> > can't tell you. The house is a new build in a
> > tract in the low desert in California. The lot
> > hasn't even been graded yet and it's a
> eventually
> > going to be a 1000 home development when built
> out
> > in about 3 years. I would be surprised if the
> > developer will go to the trouble or expense.
> >
> > Will the builder put one down? Possibly.
> That's
> > one thing that I will have to dig into.
> >
>
> My first real estate purchase was a brand new
> condominium back in the mid eighties.
> I wanted to add ceiling fixtures in both bedrooms
> as well as the dining area, add phone jacks and
> additional electric outlets in the bedrooms.
> While negotiating the deal for the unit, I asked
> if these items could be added during the
> construction process.
> The answer I got was Yes and No. The developer
> said I was not permitted to install the additional
> components myself because it would void any
> warranty from the contractors. They wouldn't offer
> it as an option or upgrade to be included in the
> financed price of the unit either BUT,,,,They did
> say it would be acceptable to pay the contractor
> to add the items if they were willing to do it,
> separate from the real estate transaction. This
> way if I didn't follow through with settlement,
> the additional work would be paid for and not
> change the sales price of the unit, or void any
> warranty.
> For a whopping $150.00 I got three ceiling
> fixtures installed, two phone jacks, and two
> electric outlets. To me this was a no brainer and
> I went ahead and had the additional work done
> through the contractors.
> As the unit was under construction and other folks
> walked through, some noticed it and also asked for
> the upgrade. Enough so that they started locking
> my unit at the end of the work day once they were
> able to secure it.
> As it turns out, the next developments this
> builder built, these items became options. I guess
> they realized there was money to be made.
>
> After all that, what I am saying is that it
> wouldn't hurt to ask the developer if they would
> have any objection to the contractor adding the
> vapor barrier if you paid the contractor directly,
> if it isn't a part of the job to begin with.
> The same could be said for adding electrical
> outlets in the walls or ceiling for door openers
> if you see a need for them.
>
> IF both, the developer and contractor are
> agreeable to the additional work if the contractor
> is paid directly and up front, you could probably
> save quite a bit of expense by going that route as
> compared to going back after settlement.
>
> It wouldn't hurt to ask. JMO

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Re: OT: garage floor coatings
Posted by: Timothy Shortle ()
Date: December 05, 2018 07:50PM

I believe in Cali a vapor barrier is required by code.

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